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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Hybridization of Invasive Saltcedars (Tamarix Ramosissima, T. Chinensis) and Athel (T. Aphylla) in the Southwestern Usa, Determined from Morphology and DNA Sequence Data

Authors
item Gaskin, John
item Shafroth, Patrick - USGS, FT. COLLINS

Submitted to: Madrono
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 20, 2004
Publication Date: March 10, 2005
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/58774
Citation: Gaskin, J.F., Shafroth, P.B. 2005. Hybridization of Tamarix ramosissima, T. chinensis (saltcedars) with T. aphylla (athel)(family Tamaricaceae) in the southwestern USA determined from DNA sequence data. Madrono. 52:1-10.

Interpretive Summary: Morphological intermediates between invasive Tamarix ramosissima or T. chinensis (saltcedars) and T. aphylla (athel) were found recently in three locations in the southwestern USA, and were assumed to be hybrids. We sequenced chloroplast and nuclear DNA from putative parental and hybrid morphotypes. Hybrid status of morphological intermediates was confirmed, and athel appears to be the seed source for these hybrids. Viable seed was collected from one of the hybrids. The hybrid combinations have not been previously reported in the USA or the native ranges of the species. Invasive athel genotypes found in Australia match those found in the USA.

Technical Abstract: Morphological intermediates between invasive Tamarix ramosissima or T. chinensis (saltcedars) and T. aphylla (athel) were found recently in three locations in the southwestern USA, and were assumed to be hybrids. We sequenced chloroplast and nuclear DNA from putative parental and hybrid morphotypes. Hybrid status of morphological intermediates was confirmed, and athel appears to be the seed source for these hybrids. Viable seed was collected from one of the hybrids. The hybrid combinations have not been previously reported in the USA or the native ranges of the species. Invasive athel genotypes found in Australia match those found in the USA.

Last Modified: 8/2/2014
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