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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Influence of Perennial Pepperweed (Lepidium Latifolium) Biology and Plant-Soil Relationships on Management and Restoration

Authors
item Renz, Mark - NEW MEXICO STATE UNIV.
item Blank, Robert

Submitted to: Weed Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2004
Publication Date: September 1, 2004
Citation: Renz, M.J., Blank, R.R. 2004. Influence of perennial pepperweed (lepidium latifolium) biology and plant-soil relationships on management and restoration. Weed Technology. 18:1359-1364.

Interpretive Summary: Perennial pepperweed is an invasive noxious weed spreading rapidly throughout a wide range of habitats in the western United States. We are undertaking applied research to develop cost effective control and restoration strategies and basic research on plant-soil relationships to uncover potentially new control strategies. Management of perennial pepperweed infestations will require site-specific tools including proper herbicide types and rates and timing of application in combination with post-control restoration utilizing site adapted and competitive grass species.

Technical Abstract: Perennial pepperweed is an invasive noxious weed spreading rapidly throughout a wide range of habitats in the western United States. Shoots form dense monotype stands with high initial leaf area, dense inflorescences, and deep litter layers that inhibit the establishment of other plant species. Roots store large amounts of carbohydrates, for future growth, establish deep into the soil, and are responsible for clonal expansion of populations. In sodic soils, increases in N, Mg, and Ca were observed in invaded compared to non-invaded areas. Several management methods are effective in controlling perennial pepperweed, but success is dependent upon age and density of infestations. Knowledge of many factors including perennial pepperweed's biology and specific characteristics of the infested area will help in the development of the most appropriate, site-specific management and restoration plans.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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