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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Wheat Stem Sawflies: Cephus Cinctus Norton, Cephus Pygmaeus (L.) and Trachelus Tabidus (F.) (Hymenoptera: Cephidae)

Author
item Shanower, Thomas

Submitted to: Encyclopedia of Entomology
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 16, 2003
Publication Date: April 1, 2004
Citation: Shanower, T.G. 2004. Wheat stem sawflies: cephus cinctus norton, cephus pygmaeus (l.) and trachelus tabidus (f.) (hymenoptera: cephidae). Encyclopedia of Entomology. 3:2545-2548.

Interpretive Summary: Several species of sawfly (Hymenoptera: Cephidae) are pests of wheat and other cereal crops worldwide. Most of the grass-feeding cephids, including the agriculturally important species, are found in the Old World. Four species are present in North America: Calameuta clavata (Norton), a non-pest species, Cephus cinctus Norton, the wheat stem sawfly, C. pygmaeus (L.), the European wheat stem sawfly, and Trachelus tabidus (F.), the black grain stem sawfly. Extensive yield losses in some years and locations have been reported. This paper reviews the distribution, biology, host plants and natural enemies of the three North American pest species. Management of wheat stem sawflies has focused on the development and use of resistant varieties and cultural practices such as tillage and crop rotation. These practices have been partially successful but each has undesirable side effects.

Technical Abstract: Several species of sawfly (Hymenoptera: Cephidae) are pests of wheat and other cereal crops worldwide. Most of the grass-feeding cephids, including the agriculturally important species, are found in the Old World. Four species are present in North America: Calameuta clavata (Norton), a non-pest species, Cephus cinctus Norton, the wheat stem sawfly, C. pygmaeus (L.), the European wheat stem sawfly, and Trachelus tabidus (F.), the black grain stem sawfly. Extensive yield losses in some years and locations have been reported. This paper reviews the distribution, biology, host plants and natural enemies of the three North American pest species. Management of wheat stem sawflies has focused on the development and use of resistant varieties and cultural practices such as tillage and crop rotation. These practices have been partially successful but each has undesirable side effects.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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