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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Potential for Application of Infected Hosts in Microbial Control

Authors
item Shapiro Ilan, David
item Lewis, Edwin - VIRGINIA TECH

Submitted to: Society for Invertebrate Pathology Annual Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 2004
Publication Date: August 1, 2004
Citation: Shapiro Ilan, D.I., Lewis, E.E. 2004. Potential for application of infected hosts in microbial control. Society for Invertebrate Pathology Annual Meeting Proceedings. p.48.

Interpretive Summary: Entomopathogenic (insect-killing nematodes are small round worms that are used as an environmentally friendly pesticide. These nematodes are generally applied for insect control in water using various sprayers or irrigation systems. Novel methods of application can reduce costs and improve pest suppression. One potential alternative is to apply nematodes in their infected hosts (dead insects). The dead insects containing developing nematodes are applied to the target site (e.g., in a greenhouse, orchard or field) and pest suppression is subsequently achieved by the nematodes that emerge from the dead insects. Our experiments indicate that application of nematodes in their infected hosts is superior to application in water. Nematodes applied in their infected hosts can survive longer, move further, kill more insects than nematodes applied in water.

Technical Abstract: Entomopathogenic nematodes are generally applied for insect control in aqueous suspension using various sprayers or irrigation systems. Novel methods of application can reduce costs and improve efficacy of pest suppression. One potential alternative is to apply nematodes in their infected hosts. Our laboratory experiments indicate advantages of greater dispersal, infectivity, and survival when applying nematodes in infected hosts compared with aqueous application. In greenhouse studies, superior efficacy was observed in suppression of Diaprepes abbreviatus and Otiorhynchus sulcatus when nematodes were applied in infected hosts. Further, our studies indicate it is feasible to store and package nematode infected hosts for commercial application

Last Modified: 11/27/2014