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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Predicting Grain, Flour, and Bread Quality Using Nir Spectroscopy

Authors
item Dowell, Floyd
item Maghirang, Elizabeth
item Xie, F - KANSAS STATE UNIV
item Chung, Okkyung
item Pierce, R - USDA-GIPSA

Submitted to: International Cereal and Bread Congress Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 19, 2004
Publication Date: May 23, 2004
Citation: Dowell, F.E., Maghirang, E.B., Xie, F., Chung, O.K., Pierce, R.O. 2004. Predicting grain, flour, and bread quality using NIR spectroscopy. International Cereal and Bread Congress Proceedings. Harrogate England. May 23-24, 2004.

Interpretive Summary: End-use quality of grain is difficult to rapidly and accurately measure. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is used throughout the grain industry to rapidly measure characteristics of whole grain and flour, and recent research also shows that it can be used to study bread staling. We studied the accuracy of NIR and Fourier Transform (FT) NIR technology for measuring the quality of whole grain, flour, and bread. The results presented in this paper should provide the grain industry with the potential and limitations of NIR and FTNIR technology for predicting grain, flour, and bread quality.

Technical Abstract: Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is used throughout the grain industry to rapidly measure characteristics of whole grain and flour, and recent research also shows that it can be used to study bread staling. We reported the accuracy of NIR and Fourier Transform (FT) NIR technology for measuring the quality of whole grain, flour, and bread. NIR and FTNIR instruments tested include the Foss 6500, Foss 1241, Perten 7200, Perten DA7000, and Cognis QTA FTNIR spectrometers. For the whole grain analysis, we reported the accuracy of using the NIR and FTNIR instruments for measuring grain quality. We also reported the correlations of NIR and FTNIR measurements to flour quality measurements conducted on the same samples after milling. The same samples were then baked and we reported the accuracy of predicting bread quality from the NIR and FTNIR spectra collected from the flour and whole grain. The results presented in this paper should provide the grain industry with the potential and limitations of NIR and FTNIR technology for predicting grain, flour, and bread quality.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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