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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Near-Surface Hydrology, Runoff Production, and Soil Loss from Surface-Applied Liquid Swine Manure

Authors
item DE Campos, A - UNIV. FEDERAL SANTA MARIA
item Reichert, J - UNIV. FEDERAL SANTA MARIA
item Huang, Chi Hua

Submitted to: International Soil Conservation Organization Conference Abstracts
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2004
Publication Date: July 4, 2004
Citation: De Campos, A.B., Reichert, J.M., Huang, C. 2004. Near-surface hydrology, runoff production, and soil loss from surface-applied liquid swine manure. In: 13th International Soil Conservation Organization Conference Proceedings, July 4-9, 2004, Brisbane, Australia. 2004 CDROM.

Technical Abstract: Excessive nutrients in surface runoff, especially from manure applications, has been a well-recognized environmental concern. Research in this subject area has been focused on relating surface runoff and soil erosion to nutrient loading with little consideration of physico-chemical conditions of the soil that may affect the chemical transport. In this research, we hypothesized that prolonged saturation may cause a change in soil surface condition, and subsequently, affect runoff and sediment production. A rainfall simulation experiment was conducted on soil pans to examine the effects of liquid swine manure application on runoff and soil loss under different hydrologic conditions. Results showed a significant change in soil loss due to manure application after 1, 7 and 28 days moisture equilibration. A possible explanation for the change in erosion is that the changes in chemical state of the moist soil and their interaction with ions in the manure, especially Na and K, affected soil aggregation and consequently, soil dispersion and loss.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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