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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of a Probiotic Containing Two Lactobacillus Strains on Growth Performance and Population of Bacteria in the Ceca and Carcass Rinse of Broiler Chickens

Authors
item Murry, A - UGA
item Hinton, Jr, Arthur
item Buhr, Richard

Submitted to: Poultry Science
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 9, 2004
Publication Date: July 26, 2004
Citation: Murry, A.C., Hinton Jr, A., Buhr, R.J. 2004. Effect of a probiotic containing two lactobacillus strains on growth performance and population of bacteria in the ceca and carcass rinse of broiler chickens [abstract]. Poultry Science Meeting Abstract. 83(suppl.1):322.

Interpretive Summary: Probiotics are live, beneficial bacteria used as dietary supplements to improve the health of animals. In the present experiment, the effect of providing chickens a feed supplemented with FeedFree probiotic was examined. Chickens were raised on a medicated diet containing antibiotics; an antibiotic-free, non-medicated diet; or a non-medicated diet supplemented with 2 different concentrations of FeedFree. Carcasses weights and the number of bacteria on the skin and in the digestive tract of broilers were determined. Results showed that there was no difference in weights of broilers fed either diet; however, broilers provided non-medicated feed with or without probiotics ate less feed while gaining the same amount of weight as broilers provided medicated feed. After processing, there was no difference in the number of bacteria on the skin of carcasses of broilers provided either diet. Additionally, there was no difference in the number of E. coli recovered from the intestinal contents of broilers provided either diet, but more acid producing bacteria were recovered from the intestines of broilers provided feed containing the highest concentration of FeedFree. Results suggest that providing broilers non-medicated feed with or without FeedFree reduces the amount of feed required for broiler growth. Furthermore, increasing the amount of FeedFree in the feed increased the number of beneficial bacteria in the intestinal tract of chickens.

Technical Abstract: The effect of providing broilers a diet supplemented with FeedFree probiotic was examined. Newly hatched broilers were divided into 5 groups that were provided a medicated basal diet, a non-medicated basal diet, a non-medicated diet supplemented with 0.10 per cent FeedFree, or a non-medicated diet supplemented with 0.20 per cent FeedFree. Broiler growth performance was measured on Days 21 and 42. On Day 56, broilers were processed and bacterial populations of broiler cecal contents and carcass rinsates were enumerated. Results showed that on Day 42, there was no significant difference in the body weights of broilers fed either diet. However, feed intake and feed to gain ratio were lower for broilers fed the non-medicated basal diet or basal diets supplemented with 0.10 or 0.20 per cent probiotic than broilers fed the medicated basal diet. After processing, there was no significant difference in the number of Campylobacter jejuni or Escherichia coli recovered from carcass rinses of broilers provided either of the diets, and there was no difference in the number of E. coli recovered from cecal contents of broilers provided either diet. However, significantly more lactobacilli were recovered from cecal contents of broilers provided diets supplemented with 0.20 per cent probiotic than from broilers fed other diets. Results suggest that providing broilers non-medicated feed with or without FeedFree reduces the amount of feed required for broiler growth. Additionally, supplementing broiler feed with 0.20 per cent FeedFree increases the number of beneficial bacteria found in the intestinal tract of chickens.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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