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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluating Silica Uptake in Bedding Plants

Authors
item Frantz, Jonathan
item Pitchay, D - UNIVERSITY OF TOLEDO
item Locke, James
item Krause, Charles

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 14, 2004
Publication Date: July 1, 2004
Citation: Frantz, J., Pitchay, D., Locke, J.C., Krause, C.R. 2004. Evaluating silica uptake in bedding plants. Hortscience. 39(4):776.

Technical Abstract: Silica (Si) is not considered to be an essential plant nutrient because without it, most plant can be grown from seed to seed without its presence. However, many investigations have shown a positive growth effect if Si is present, including increased dry weight, increased yield, enhanced pollination, and most commonly, increased disease resistance, which leads to its official designation as a beneficial nutrient. Surprisingly, some effects, such as reduced incidence of micronutrient toxicity, appear to occur even if Si is not taken up in appreciable amounts. The literature results must be interpreted with care, however, because many of the benefits can be obtained with the counterion of the Si supplied to the plant. Determining a potential benefit from Si could be a large benefit to greenhouse plant producers because more production is using soilless media that are devoid of Si. Therefore, Si must be applied either as a foliar spray or nutrient solution amendment. We investigated adding Si to New Guinea Impatiens (Impatiens hawkeri Bull), marigold (Tagetes erecta), pansy (Viola wittrockiana), spreading petunia (Petunia hybridia), geranium (Pelargonium spp.), and orchid (Phalaenopsis spp.). Using SEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and ICP analysis, Si content and location was determined. This information and other growth characteristics will be used as a first step in determining the likelihood of using Si as a beneficial element in greenhouse fertilizer solutions for higher quality bedding plants with fewer agrochemical inputs.

Last Modified: 11/1/2014
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