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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Simulating Crop Phenology

Author
item McMaster, Gregory

Submitted to: International Crop Science Congress Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: June 10, 2003
Publication Date: March 17, 2004
Citation: MCMASTER, G.S. SIMULATING CROP PHENOLOGY. INTERNATIONAL CROP SCIENCE CONGRESS. Brisbane, Australia. September 26-October 1, 2004. Published on CDROM.

Interpretive Summary: There are many reasons we wish to understand and predict crop phenology. Often management practices are timed based on crop growth stage to improve efficacy. Also, accuracy phenology submodels are critical for crop simulation models and decision support systems. Unfortunately, the entire canopy developmental sequence and phenology has only by synthesized and quantified for a few crops. This paper reports the status of a model for predicting crop phenology (Phenology MMS) that can be used independently to simulate crop development or incorporated into existing crop growth models. This new model is intended to synthesize and quantify the entire developmental sequence of the shoot apex of many crops, making this information readily available to users with limited knowledge of phenology or the crop being simulated. Developmental sequences for winter wheat and corn are presented as examples of model structure, use, and performance.

Technical Abstract: Understanding and predicting crop phenology and canopy development is important for many reasons including improving the efficacy of management practices and accuracy of simulation models and decision support systems. This paper reports the status of a model for predicting crop phenology (Phenology MMS) that can be used independently to simulate crop development or incorporated into existing crop growth models. This new model is intended to synthesize and quantify the entire developmental sequence of the shoot apex of many crops, making this information readily available to users with limited knowledge of phenology or the crop being simulated. Developmental sequences for winter wheat and corn are presented as examples of model structure, use, and performance.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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