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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Trends and Fashions in Fruit Cultivar Development

Author
item Hummer, Kim

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 20, 2004
Publication Date: July 20, 2004
Citation: Hummer, K.E. 2004. Trends and fashions in fruit cultivar development [abstract]. Hortscience. 39(4):726

Interpretive Summary: Fashions and trends can be seen in the fruits in our marketplace. Successful fruit breeding, development, and cultivar release requires decades of background work. How do small fruit, stone fruit and pome fruit breeders, producers, and marketers keep up with these fads, trends and changing desires of the consumer? Do breeders, growers, retailers, or consumers drive these trends? What shifts in blackberry post harvest handling will expand the market? How will blackberry primocane fruiting be targeted to meet consumer needs? Peaches now come to us redefined as yellow or white nectarines or even as doughnuts. How is this happening? What promising selections of peaches, plums, nectarines, and apricots will keep farms profitable in the near future? Consumers seem to want new and exciting flavors in apples, yet retailers cannot market every apple under the sun and want only four to six stable varieties. Marketers have to balance the reality of available fruit with what consumers want. New strategies, such as 'variety clubs' are a way to re-invent a variety. Continuous supply, category management, and value chains in the fruit/variety business may provide marketing solutions. A panel of three fruit breeders and an agricultural economist will discuss these issues.

Technical Abstract: Fashions and trends can be seen in the fruits in our marketplace. Successful fruit breeding, development, and cultivar release requires decades of background work. How do small fruit, stone fruit and pome fruit breeders, producers, and marketers keep up with these fads, trends and changing desires of the consumer? Do breeders, growers, retailers, or consumers drive these trends? What shifts in blackberry post harvest handling will expand the market? How will blackberry primocane fruiting be targeted to meet consumer needs? Peaches now come to us redefined as yellow or white nectarines or even as doughnuts. How is this happening? What promising selections of peaches, plums, nectarines, and apricots will keep farms profitable in the near future? Consumers seem to want new and exciting flavors in apples, yet retailers cannot market every apple under the sun and want only four to six stable varieties. Marketers have to balance the reality of available fruit with what consumers want. New strategies, such as 'variety clubs' are a way to re-invent a variety. Continuous supply, category management, and value chains in the fruit/variety business may provide marketing solutions. A panel of three fruit breeders and an agricultural economist will discuss these issues.

Last Modified: 10/26/2014
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