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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Prevalence of Enterocytozoon Bieneusi in Post-Weaned Dairy Calves in the Eastern United States

Authors
item Santin, Monica - ARS VISITING SCIENTIST
item Trout, James
item FAYER, RONALD

Submitted to: Parasitology Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 16, 2004
Publication Date: May 29, 2004
Citation: Santin, M.D., Trout, J.M., Fayer, R. 2004. Prevalence of enterocytozoon bieneusi in post-weaned dairy calves in the eastern united states. Parasitology Research. 93:287-289.

Interpretive Summary: Microsporidia are tiny infectious agents of humans and animals. The most prevalent species infecting humans, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, has recently been detected by ARS scientists and collaborators in wild fur-bearing animals and cattle in North America. In the present study molecular tools were used to test post-weaned dairy for the presence of this organism. Fecal specimens were obtained from calves on farms in Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, and Florida. After applying methods to purify and concentrate any spores that might be present in the feces, 59 of 452 calves (13%) from 11 farms in 6 states, were found positive for E. bieneusi . Data from this study, compared with previously reported data for younger pre-weaned calves from many of the same farms, indicated that the prevalence of E. bieneusi was significantly higher in post-weaned than in pre-weaned calves.

Technical Abstract: Fecal specimens were obtained from 3-to-8-month-old post-weaned dairy calves on farms in Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, and Florida. After removal of fecal debris by sieving and density gradient centrifugation, 59 of 452 calves (13%) from 11 farms in 6 states, were found positive for E. bieneusi by PCR and DNA sequence analysis. Data from this study, compared with previously reported data for younger pre-weaned calves from many of the same farms, indicated that the prevalence of E. bieneusi was significantly higher in post-weaned than in pre-weaned calves.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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