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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Phylloquinone (Vitamin K1) Content of Vegetables

Authors
item Damon, Molly - TUFTS-HNRCA
item Zhang, Nancy - TUFTS-HNRCA
item Haytowitz, David
item Booth, Sarah - TUFTS-HNRCA

Submitted to: Journal of Food Composition and Analysis
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 14, 2004
Publication Date: February 11, 2005
Citation: Damon, M., Zhang, N., Haytowitz, D.B., Booth, S. 2005. Phylloquinone (Vitamin K1) content of vegetables. Journal of Food Composition and Analysis. 18:751-758. Available online at http://www.sciencedirect.com doi:10.1016/j.jfca.2004.07.004

Interpretive Summary: Assessment of vitamin K dietary intakes has been limited by incomplete vitamin K food composition data for the U.S. food supply. The vitamin K concentrations of a variety of 218 geographically representative vegetables were determined. Green leafy and flower vegetables including broccoli, broccoli raab, spinach, and certain lettuces, contained more vitamin K than raw tubers and roots. Iceberg lettuce, a primary dietary source of vitamin K, contained less than previously listed in nutrient databases. Potential factors affecting vitamin K concentrations include processing and varietal type of leafy vegetables.

Technical Abstract: Assessment of vitamin K (VK) dietary intakes has been limited by incomplete VK food composition data for the U.S. food supply. The phylloquinone (VK-1 or vitamin K1) concentrations of a variety of geographically representative vegetables (n=218) were determined by reversed-phase HPLC with fluorescent detection. Green leafy and flower vegetables including broccoli, broccoli raab, spinach, and certain lettuces, contained >100mg phylloquinone/100g vegetable. In contrast, raw tubers and roots contained <10mg phylloquinone/100g vegetable. Iceberg lettuce, a primary dietary source of phylloquinone, contained 24.1mg phylloquinone/100g vegetable, which is less than previously listed in nutrient databases. Potential factors affecting phylloquinone concentrations include processing and varietal type of leafy vegetables.

Last Modified: 7/31/2014
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