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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Southern Regional Research Center Reveals Colorful New Methods

Authors
item Kimmel, Linda
item DELHOM, CHRISTOPHER
item Folk, Craig - RETIRED - SRRC

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 6, 2004
Publication Date: January 6, 2004
Citation: Kimmel, L.B., Delhom, C.D., Folk, C. 2004. SOUTHERN REGIONAL RESEARCH CENTER REVEALS COLORFUL NEW METHODS. Proceeding of the 2004 National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference. p. 2736-2741.

Interpretive Summary: Naturally colored cotton refers to plant that produce fiber in any color other than white. Breeders have improved the properties of some varieties recently. However, the presence of short, weak fibers causes some concerns for processing. The purpose of this paper is to summarize select experiences of government scientists that worked with the fibers for several years. Some of this information was not published previously due to a variety of circumstances. Our program has revealed a large range of properties among colored cottons. Experiences suggest that processing colored cotton on common textile is generally not a problem except that minor accommodations can help reduce fiber breakage or loss and improve product uniformity. Blending colored cotton with other natural or synthetic fibers is an easy way to facilitate processing but may also dilute color intensity. This paper reports on a method developed at SRRC that uses fusible fibers to dramatically increase the strength of colored cotton materials. Finally, a previously undisclosed method of converting short weak fibers into superior core yarns is revealed. The invention provides for the separate supply of core and wrap fibers to produce bicomponent core yarns. The novel approach is totally different from the core yarn methods previously developed at this location, and produces more uniform core yarns.

Technical Abstract: Naturally colored cotton refers to cultivars that produce lint in any color other than white. Breeders have improved the agronomic and physical properties of some colored cottons recently. However, the prevalence of short, weak fibers has presented some real and perceived processing concerns. The purpose of this paper is to report on the experiences of government scientists during their work with colored cotton. It briefly summarizes some of our major research accomplishments. Some of this information was not published due to commercial conflicts, contractual constraints, and/or proprietary issues. Our program has revealed a large range of properties among colored cottons. Experiences suggest that processing colored cotton on conventional machines is generally not a problem but minor accommodations for speed or settings can reduce fiber breakage or loss and improve product uniformity. Blending colored cotton with other natural or synthetic fibers is an easy way to facilitate processing on conventional machines but may also dilute color intensity. This paper reports on a method developed at SRRC that uses fusible fibers to dramatically increase the strength of colored cotton materials. Finally, a previously undisclosed method of converting short weak fibers into superior core yarns is revealed. The invention provides for the separate supply of core and wrap fibers during the production of bicomponent core yarns. The novel approach is totally different from the core yarn methods previously developed at this location, and produces more uniform core yarns.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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