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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Quality and Safety Characteristics of Infrared Dried Onion Products

Authors
item Gabel, Michael - UC DAVIS, DAVIS, CA
item Pan, Zhongli
item Amaratunga, Kahawattage - UC DAVIS, DAVIS, CA

Submitted to: American Society of Agricultural Engineers Meetings Papers
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 31, 2004
Publication Date: August 1, 2004
Citation: Gabel, M., Pan, Z., Amaratunga, S. 2004. Quality and Safety Characteristics of Infrared Dried Onion Products. American Society of Agricultural Engineers Meetings Papers. Paper No. 046189, 1-10.

Interpretive Summary: California produces 75% of the dehydrator onions in the United States. The onions are commonly dried with conventional convective drying which is inefficient and costly. Therefore, this study examined possible advantages of infrared drying for onions. Onions dehydrated using a catalytic flameless gas-fired infrared (CFGIR) drier had a significantly higher drying rate at 70 degrees C when compared to the forced air convection (FAC) drier. No major differences in quality attributes, namely pungency and color, were found in samples dehydrated by each drying method. Onions dried in the FCGIR drier resulted in better color compared to retail samples of onions powder and minced onions. FCGIR drying could have great potentials for fruits and vegetables.

Technical Abstract: California produces 75% of the dehydrator onions in the United States. The onions are commonly dried with conventional convective drying which is inefficient and costly. Therefore, this study examined possible advantages of infrared drying for onions. Onions dehydrated using a catalytic flameless gas-fired infrared (CFGIR) drier had a significantly higher drying rate at 70 degrees C when compared to the forced air convection (FAC) drier. Samples dried at 60 degrees C showed no significant difference between the different drying methods. Air recirculation within the FCGIR also did not contribute to increased drying rate. No major differences in quality attributes, namely pungency and color, were found in samples dehydrated by each drying method. Onions dried in the FCGIR drier resulted in better color compared to retail samples of onions powder and minced onions. FCGIR drying could have great potentials for fruits and vegetables.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014
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