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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Factors Affecting Sprouting and Glyphosate Translocation in Rootstocks of Redvine (Brunnichia Ovata) and Trumpetcreeper (Campsis Radicans)

Authors
item Chachalis, D - NAT GREEK AGRL RES FND
item Reddy, Krishna

Submitted to: Weed Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 30, 2004
Publication Date: January 1, 2005
Citation: Chachalis, D., Reddy, K.N. 2005. Factors affecting sprouting and glyphosate translocation in rootstocks of redvine (brunnichia ovata) and trumpetcreeper (campsis radicans). Weed Technology 19:141-147.

Interpretive Summary: Redvine and trumpetcreeper are native perennial fast growing woody vines found extensively in crop and noncrop lands in the Mississippi Delta region. They are difficult to control because of an extensive deep root system and regenerative capability of rootstocks due to numerous adventitious buds. Scientists at the Southern Weed Science Research Unit, Stoneville, MS conducted studies to understand rootstock biology of these vines. Redvine sprouts exhibited apical dominance compared to trumpetcreeper. Sprouting was higher in trumpetcreeper than in redvine rootstocks across all temperature regimes (15 to 40 C). At 15 C, redvine sprouting was totally inhibited, whereas trumpetcreeper had 12% sprouting. Emergence of propagules from 28-cm depth was inhibited in redvine, whereas trumpetcreeper had 23% emergence. Redvine segments of less than 2 cm had almost no sprouts, while trumpetcreeper had more than 13% sprouts. Translocation of 14C-glyphosate was apparent from treated-shoot attached to one end of a rootstock to the untreated end of a 35-cm rootstock with slightly lower amounts moving farther and farther away from treated end. These results suggest that under field conditions, any tillage practices that promote exposure of underground rootstocks to cold temperatures and/or break the rootstocks in to short segments could potentially reduce density of redvine and trumpetcreeper.

Technical Abstract: Greenhouse and growth chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the sprouting potential of rootstock; the effect of temperature, burial depth, and length of rootstock on sprouting; and the effect of shoot removal on re-sprouting ability of rootstock in redvine and trumpetcreeper. Glyphosate translocation along the rootstock of redvine was also measured. Redvine rootstock segments of 20-cm long produced almost single sprouts at any point on the segment compared to trumpetcreeper that developed multiple sprouts mostly at the end of the 20-cm long segment. Sprouting was higher at 20 to 40 C in trumpetcreeper (60 to 73%) and at 30 to 40 C in redvine (45 to 47%) compared to other temperatures. At 15 C, redvine sprouting was totally inhibited, whereas trumpetcreeper had a sprouting of 12%. Emergence of propagules from 28-cm planting depth was inhibited in redvine, whereas trumpetcreeper had 23% sprout emergence. In redvine, rootstock segments =2-cm long reached a total depletion by fifth shoot removal (15 WAP). In trumpetcreeper, total depletion was not reached by 15 WAP, regardless of rootstock length. Translocation of 14C-glyphosate was apparent from treated-shoot attached to one end of a rootstock to the untreated end of a 35-cm rootstock with slightly lower amounts moving farther and farther away from treated end. These results indicated that redvine is more susceptible to cooler temperatures, deeper burial depth, and shorter root segments than trumpetcreeper. Variable control of redvine with glyphosate could be due to its inadequate translocation and decreased movement farther along the rootstock.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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