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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Pathogen Reduction by Manure Composting: Issue, Criteria, and Testing

Author
item Millner, Patricia

Submitted to: Manure Management Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 2003
Publication Date: November 3, 2003
Citation: MILLNER, P.D. PATHOGEN REDUCTION BY MANURE COMPOSTING: ISSUE, CRITERIA, AND TESTING. MANURE MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS.

Technical Abstract: The potential for contamination of water and soil from manure pathogens is clearly greatest when untreated manure is surface applied to pasture, cropland, or other fields without regard to protective and diversion barriers. Appropriate treatment of manure prior to land application would reduce major potential source release of pathogens into the environment. Furthermore, treatment can render manure less attractive to vectors. With fewer pathogens present, and less appeal to vectors, treated manure even when stored, can improve control of pathogen dissemination within and around animal facilities. Composting is a relatively cost-effective method for treating manure to reduce pathogens, but to be used as a disinfection process, it needs to be conducted in a management context that includes specific time/temperature monitoring and mixing so that all parts of the piles are adequately heated. The method used depends on availability of equipment, land, type and amounts of manure, as well as supplements available for mixing into the pile. Types of composting include: bin, static pile, static force-aerated pile, windrow, in-vessel, tunnel, and channel. Time and temperature criteria applicable to biosolids disinfection by composting, i.e. specified in 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 503, have become widely used benchmarks for nonbiosolids compost, including manure, in several states and jurisdictions in the U.S. Details about and current evaluations of disinfection of various manures by composting will be presented.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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