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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Role of Newcastle Disease Virus Fusion, Phosphoprotein, and Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Genes in Causation of Disease

Authors
item Wakamatsu, Nobuko - UNIV OF GA - ATHENS, GA
item King, Daniel
item Seal, Bruce
item Peeters, Ben - LELYSTAD-THE NETHERLANDS
item Samal, Siba - UNIV OF MD-COLLEGE PK, MD
item Brown, Corrie - UNIV OF GA - ATHENS, GA

Submitted to: American Veterinary Medical Association Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 15, 2003
Publication Date: July 19, 2003
Citation: WAKAMATSU, N., KING, D.J., SEAL, B.S., PEETERS, B., SAMAL, S., BROWN, C. THE ROLE OF NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS FUSION, PHOSPHOPROTEIN, AND HEMAGGLUTININ-NEURAMINIDASE GENES IN CAUSATION OF DISEASE. AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION ABSTRACT. 2003.

Technical Abstract: Newcastle disease virus (NDV) encodes six structural proteins. Very little is known concerning the contributions of the various proteins to virulence. To elucidate the nature of three different genes, fusion (F), hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), and phosphoprotein (P) genes, groups of 4-week-old White Leghorn chickens were inoculated intraconjunctivally with two sets of wild type strains and their infectious clones. Specifically, the La Sota virus backbone with a virulent F protein cleavage site amino acid sequence and a Beaudette C virus with various mutations in the P and HN genes were utilized. Birds were monitored clinically and euthanized sequentially, with swabs, blood, and tissues collected. No significant clinical signs or gross lesions were observed in any birds with wild-type La Sota and their clones. Birds infected with wild-type Beaudette C exhibited severe nervous signs with mortality, while birds inoculated with the recombinant viruses displayed some nervous signs. Preliminary findings indicate that presence of the virulent F protein cleavage site amino acid sequence within a lentogenic background is not sufficient to cause disease. Additionally, modifying the P and HN genes within a virulent virus causes a decrease in disease severity.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014
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