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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Characterization of Waxy Grain Sorghum Lines in Relation to Granule Bound Starch Synthase

Authors
item Pedersen, Jeffrey
item Bean, Scott
item Graybosch, Robert
item Park, Seok Ho
item Tilley, Michael

Submitted to: Euphytica
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 28, 2005
Publication Date: July 1, 2005
Citation: Pedersen, J.F., Bean, S., Graybosch, R.A., Park, S.H., Tilley, M. 2005. Characterization of waxy grain sorghum lines in relation to granule bound starch synthase. Euphytica 144:151-156.

Interpretive Summary: Cereal grains containing little or no amylose (a type of starch) are commonly referred to as 'waxy' due to wax-like appearance of their endosperm when broken. This is caused by the absence or inactivation of an enzyme, granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS). Such waxy grains have unique properties making them valuable in food products, and for industrial applications. Variants of the gene controlling the waxy trait are well established in many cereals, but the waxy trait has been assumed to be controlled by a single gene in sorghum and expressed as a single phenotype. This research identifies two waxy sorghum phenotypes, those with no GBSS, and those with apparently inactive GBSS, which is indicative of the existence of multiple alleles controlling the waxy character in sorghum. It also identifies sorghum lines with the differing phenotypes. These identified lines will serve as the basis for better understanding the control of starch synthesis in sorghum.

Technical Abstract: Cereal grains containing little or no amylose (a type of starch) are commonly referred to as 'waxy' due to wax-like appearance of their endosperm when broken. This is caused by the absence or inactivation of an enzyme, granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS). Such waxy grains have unique properties making them valuable in food products, and for industrial applications. Variants of the gene controlling the waxy trait are well established in many cereals, but the waxy trait has been assumed to be controlled by a single gene in sorghum and expressed as a single phenotype. This research identifies two waxy sorghum phenotypes, those with no GBSS, and those with apparently inactive GBSS, which is indicative of the existence of multiple alleles controlling the waxy character in sorghum. It also identifies sorghum lines with the differing phenotypes. These identified lines will serve as the basis for better understanding the control of starch synthesis in sorghum.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014