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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Registration of Mo48 and Mo49 Maize Germplasm Lines with Resistance to European Corn Borer

Authors
item Willmot, David
item Hibbard, Bruce
item Barry, Dean - USDA RETIRED
item Antonio, Arnulfo
item Darrah, Larry

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 26, 2004
Publication Date: January 28, 2005
Citation: Willmot, D.B., Hibbard, B.E., Barry, D., Antonio, A.Q., Darrah, L.L. 2005. Registration of MO48 and MO49 maize germplasm lines with resistance to european corn borer. Crop Science. 45:426-427.

Interpretive Summary: Corn (maize) germplasm lines Mo48 and Mo49 are yellow dent inbred lines developed for European corn borer (ECB) resistance by the Plant Genetics Research Unit of the USDA-ARS in cooperation with the Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Missouri-Columbia. European corn borers continue to cause economic losses by tunneling into stalks, shanks, and ears; disrupting growth; and introducing rotting organisms which results in fallen plants and ears. These lines contain diverse sources of resistance to this important economic pest and offer a source of native-plant, non-transgenic germplasm for breeders to incorporate into commercial corn. This germplasm release will benefit corn breeders and eventually farmers by providing additional sources of resistance to European corn borer.

Technical Abstract: Corn (maize) germplasm lines Mo48 and Mo49 are yellow dent inbred lines developed for European corn borer (ECB) resistance by the Plant Genetics Research Unit of the USDA-ARS in cooperation with the Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Missouri-Columbia. European corn borers continue to cause economic losses by tunneling into stalks, shanks, and ears; disrupting growth; and introducing rotting organisms which results in fallen plants and ears. These lines contain diverse sources of resistance to this important economic pest and offer a source of native-plant, non-transgenic germplasm for breeders to incorporate into commercial corn.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
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