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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Effect of Three Resistant Soybean Genotypes on the Fecundity, Mortality, and Maturation of the Soybean Aphid, Aphis Glycines (Homoptera: Aphididae)

Authors
item Li, Yan - UNIV OF ILLINOIS
item Hill, Curtis - UNIV OF ILLINOIS
item Hartman, Glen

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 23, 2004
Publication Date: June 16, 2004
Citation: Li,H.S., Ko, T.S., Domier, L.L., Kim, H.G., Hartman, G.L. 2004. The effect of three resistant sobyean genotypes on the fecundity, mortality, and maturation of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines (Homoptera: Aphididae). Journal of Economic Entomology. 97:1106-1111.

Interpretive Summary: The soybean aphid, was reported as a new pest of soybean in the Midwest in 2000. It rapidly spread throughout the region and into other parts of North America. The damage caused by soybean aphid feeding includes stunting, leaf distortion, and reduced pod set. The soybean aphid was studied on three resistant soybean genotypes and two susceptible genotypes. Antibiosis in the resistant genotypes was demonstrated by a significant decrease in reproduction and increased mortality. Observations of aphid behavior on leaves indicated that aphids departed from the leaves of resistant plants 8 to 24 h after being placed on them while they remained indefinitely on leaves of susceptible cultivars and developed colonies. This is the first research work on aphid feeding patterns using resistant and susceptible soybean types. This information will be useful to scientist working in plant protection, and host induced responses to biotic stresses.

Technical Abstract: The fecundity, longevity, mortality, and maturation of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Homoptera: Aphididae), were characterized using three resistant soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] genotypes (Dowling, Jackson, and PI200538) and two susceptible genotypes (Pana and Loda). Antibiosis in the resistant genotypes was demonstrated by a significant decrease in fecundity and longevity and increased mortality of A. glycines. Aphid fecundity, measured as number of offspring produced in the first 10 days by each viviparous aptera (a wingless female adult with parthenogenetic reproduction), was higher on Pana than on the resistant genotypes. Aphid longevity, the mean number of days a one-day-old adult lived, was 7 days longer on Pana than on Dowling and Jackson. The mortality of both viviparous apterae and nymphs on resistant genotypes was significantly higher than on susceptible genotypes. A greater number of first instar nymphs survived to maturation stage (date of first reproduction) on susceptible plants than on resistant plants. None of the first instars placed on Dowling and PI 200538 leaves survived to maturation. Observations of aphid behavior on leaves indicated that aphids departed from the leaves of resistant plants 8 to 24 h after being placed on them while they remained indefinitely on leaves of susceptible cultivars and developed colonies.

Last Modified: 11/22/2014
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