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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Population Response of Feral Rye and Jointed Goatgrass to Management Strategies

Author
item Anderson, Randal

Submitted to: Western Society of Weed Science Research Reports
Publication Type: Research Notes
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 2003
Publication Date: March 1, 2004
Citation: Anderson, R.L. 2004. Population response of feral rye and jointed goatgrass to management strategies. Western Society of Weed Science Research Reports. pp. 173-174.

Interpretive Summary: Producers in the Central Great Plains are still striving to manage feral rye and jointed goatgrass in winter wheat. Our objective with this project was to estimate impact of management strategies on population changes with these species. Our simulation indicates that adding summer annual crops and applying imazamox are the most effective strategies with both species. Imazamox is a new herbicide recently developed to control jointed goatgrass in winter wheat. Effectiveness of all strategies is enhanced by combining strategies into cultural systems. Population demographics of these two species have been quantified, and designing management systems based on these characteristics can greatly enhance management success by producers. Cultural systems can be as effective as imazamox in managing these species.

Technical Abstract: Producers in the Central Great Plains are still striving to manage feral rye and jointed goatgrass in winter wheat. Our objective with this project was to estimate impact of management strategies on population changes with these species. We hypothesized that these species would respond differently to cultural strategies because of their demographic characteristics; thus, best management practices may differ between species. With both species, adding corn to the rotation and applying imazamox were the most effective in minimizing pouplation growth. The species differed in response to delay of planting, with feral rye being more affected by later planting of winter wheat. This trend reflects feral rye emergence within a short time frame after fall precipitation, contrasting with jointed goatgrass emerging over several weeks. Delay of planting was least effective among all strategies with jointed goatgrass. Improving competitiveness of winter wheat impacted jointed goatgrass population change more than feral rye. Compared with other strategies, tillage during fallow was less effective with both species. Management of these speices can be improved considerably with combinations of cultural strategies. For example, combining a competitive wheat canopy with a diverse rotation (W-C-F) almost eliminated the population of jointed goatgrass.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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