Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Nutrient Levels in Drainage Water Affected by Turf Management

Authors
item King, Kevin
item Balogh, James - SPECTRUM RESEARCH, INC
item Fausey, Norman

Submitted to: International Drainage Symposium
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: October 3, 2003
Publication Date: March 23, 2004
Citation: KING, K.W., BALOGH, J.C., FAUSEY, N.R. NUTRIENT LEVELS IN DRAINAGE WATER AFFECTED BY TURF MANAGEMENT. INTERNATIONAL DRAINAGE SYMPOSIUM. 2004. P. 181-188.

Technical Abstract: Knowledge of the water and soil quality in urban watersheds is becoming increasingly important from a regulatory and environmental perspective. Recent evidence suggests turfgrass nutrients in runoff and subsurface flow pose potential risks to surface water quality. Research on water quality associated with turfgrass has focused on surface runoff, but not subsurface flows. Establishing the potential for input of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) to streams from subsurface drainage features on golf courses is essential for many urban managers especially those under regulatory scrutiny. Discharges from two gravel filled trenches, located on Morris Williams' Municipal Golf Course, were monitored for nutrients (NO3+NO2-N and PO4-P) and flow volume. Median concentrations of NO3+NO2-N and PO4-P in this drainage water were significantly different (p = 0.05) from zero. Based on measured discharge volume and nutrient concentration, a substantial amount of total nitrogen (4.3%) and phosphorus (5.0%) fertilizer is lost through subsurface drainage. NO3+NO2-N losses tended to follow a seasonal pattern with peak concentrations generally occurring in fall and winter. Peaks were also lagged from application by approximately two to four months. A strong seasonal pattern with respect to PO4-P concentrations was not detected. The findings of this study suggest a need for an integrated management plan with respect to turf type, nutrients, and water management. Subsurface flow has a significant effect on the hydrologic and nutrient balances on turfgrass systems.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page