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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Management of Late Season Insect Pests.

Authors
item Godfrey, L. - UNIV. OF CA - DAVIS, CA
item Goodell, P. - UC-KAC, PARLIER, CA
item McGuire, Michael
item Hutmacher, R. - UNIV. OF CA - DAVIS, CA
item Bancroft, Jay
item Keillor, K. - UNIV. OF CA - DAVIS, CA

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 10, 2003
Publication Date: January 10, 2003
Citation: GODFREY, L.D., GOODELL, P., MCGUIRE, M.R., HUTMACHER, R., BANCROFT, J.S., KEILLOR, K. 2003. MANAGEMENT OF LATE SEASON INSECT PESTS. NATIONAL COTTON COUNCIL BELTWIDE COTTON CONFERENCE. 2003 CDROM.

Technical Abstract: Insecticides and acaricides account for about 10% of the budget required to grow cotton in the San Joaquin Valley during the typical year. Estimates of cotton yield loss from spider mites, cotton aphids, lygus bugs, and lepidopterous larvae in the SJV have been as high as 15% during the peak years in the mid-1990's. In 2001, a new challenge arose in terms of arthropod management in SJV cotton. Sticky cotton, arising from honeydew from cotton aphids and silverleaf whiteflies, became an issue in SJV cotton. Environmental conditions were conducive to honeydew deposition on exposed lint and late-season cotton aphid and silverleaf whitefly populations developed in many areas. Appropriate research was planned to address management of silverleaf whitefly and cotton aphids in order to protect lint quality. Efficacy of registered insecticides (including some newly registered products) on cotton aphids during the late-season period was examined. The most cost-efficient means to utilize these insecticides in management programs were examined. The interaction between harvest aid materials and aphid and whitefly populations was a priority for research efforts.

Last Modified: 10/19/2014
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