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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A New Exotic Weed on Great Basin Rangelands

Authors
item Young, James
item Clements, Darin
item Wilson, Robert - UNIV NV RENO,EXTENSION

Submitted to: Rangelands
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 2002
Publication Date: February 9, 2003
Citation: YOUNG, J.A., CLEMENTS, D.D., WILSON, R. A New Exotic Weed on Great Basin Rangelands. RANGELANDS. 2003.

Interpretive Summary: Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia is native to southeastern Europe and Asia. It was first identified in North America in 1911 near Portland, Oregon. Apparently it did not persist. A second identification of this weed species was made near Eureka, Nevada in 1968. Currently this weed has spread over 200 km east and west of US Highway 50 and approximately 100 km north and south of the highway on secondary roads. This article describes the range and adaptations of this species as well as associated species, life form, vegetative propagation and seed production and dispersal. Problems associated with weed identification can aide in the spread of these weeds as weed control programs are not initiated until the weed becomes widely dispersed and of serious concern on many scales.

Technical Abstract: Millions of dollars have been spent on efforts to stop the spread of invasive range weed species. Often these efforts do not occur until the weed becomes widely established and become major problems over extensive areas. The first problem that resource managers face is proper identification of the species. Often, by the time proper identification has been made the weed has taken a foothold on large acreages and already poses a serious weed problem. Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia was first identified in North America near Portland, Oregon in 1911. The next identification of this weed species was made near Eureka, Nevada in 1968. Currently this weed species has move approximately 200 km east and west of US Highway 50 and 100 km north and south of the highway on secondary roads. This weed doesn't even have a common name so we have attached Wilson Weed (named after the local extension agent) which has gained some wide acceptance. This article describes the life form, seed production, associated species, range and adaptation to inform interested parties of this species and its' potential to spread across millions of acres western rangelands.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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