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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Brassica Elongata Ssp. Integrifolia Seed Germination

Authors
item Young, James
item Clements, Darin
item Wilson, Robert - UNIV NV RENO,EXTENSION

Submitted to: Journal of Range Management
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 15, 2002
Publication Date: October 1, 2003
Citation: Young, J.A., Clements, D.D., Wilson, R. 2003. Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia seed germination. Journal of Range Management. 56(6): 623-626.

Interpretive Summary: Repeatedly during the late 19th and early 20th century, exotic weeds were introduced to the sagebrush (Artemisia)/bunchgrass rangelads of the great Basin. Once established these weeds became invasive, spreading without the conscious efforts of humans. Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia offers evidence this process of introduction still continues. The first step in understanding seed and seedbed ecology of this species we investigated the germination of seeds at a wide range of constant and alternating temperatures. This plant produced abundant seeds that germinated over a wide range of constant and alternating temperatures. Maximum germination ranged from 84% to 94% depending on the year of seed production. Germination though, was extremely limited at very cold seedbed temperatures. Germination of these temperatures is a competitive advantage for other exotic species on Great Basin rangelads.

Technical Abstract: Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia (Boiss)Breister. Is native to southeastern Europe and Asia. It was first collected in North America near Portland, Oregon in 1911. The next collection was near Eureka, Nevada in 1968. The introduction of exotic weeds in the late 19th and early 20th century onto Great Basin rangelands has resulted in many of these weeds becoming invasive, and spreading without the conscious of humans. Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia offers evidence that this process of introduction still continues. Currently, Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia has spread about 200 km east and west along US Highway 50 and 100 km north and south of the highway along secondary roads. As a first step in understanding the seed and seedbed ecology of this species we investigated the germination of seeds of this species at a wide range of constant and alternating temperatures. This species produced an abundant number of seds that germinated over a wide range of constant and alternating temperatures. Maximum germination ranged from 84% to 94% depending on the year of seed production. Germination was extremely limited at very cold seedbed temperatures. Though, germination at these very cold temperatures is known to be an competitive advantage to other exotic species on Great Basin rangelands.

Last Modified: 12/25/2014
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