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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Powdery Mildew

Author
item Campbell, Larry

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 2003
Publication Date: February 1, 2005
Citation: Campbell, L.G. 2005. Powdery mildew. In: Biancardi, E., Campbell, L.G., Skaracis, G.N., and De Biaggi, M. Genetics and Breeding of Sugar Beet. Enfield, New Hampshire, Science Publishers, Inc. p. 90-92.

Interpretive Summary: Powdery mildew occurs worldwide on sugar beet causing root yield losses, reductions in sugar content and sucrose extraction rates. The disease first appears as disperse whitish mats on older leaves and rapidly spreads over all leaf surfaces. Powdery mildew has been recognized on sugar beet for more than a century; however, since the early 1970s it has been recognized as a problem in commercial production in Europe and North America. Accompanying this increase in disease prevalence has been an increased effort to find resistant germplasm and develop hybrids with useful levels of powdery mildew resistance. A primary source of resistance genes has been the wild relatives of sugar beet. Many of the resistant lines developed could be characterized as moderately resistant or slow-mildewing. A single dominant gene that confers a high level of resistance has been identified in two lines. In addition, techniques for selecting for powdery mildew resistance in greenhouse trials and field nurseries are summarized.

Technical Abstract: Powdery mildew (Erysiphe betae (Vanha) Weltz.) occurs worldwide on sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) causing root yield losses, reductions in sugar concentration, and increases in impurity concentrations. The disease first appears as disperse whitish mats of hyphe on older leaves and rapidly spreads over all leaf surfaces. Powdery mildew has been recognized on sugar beet for more than a century; however, since the early 1970s it has been recognized as a problem in commercial production in Europe and North America. Accompanying this increase in disease prevalence has been an increased effort to find resistant germplasm and develop hybrids with useful levels of powdery mildew resistance. A primary source of resistance genes has been the wild relatives of sugar beet (B. maritima). Many of the resistant lines developed could be characterized as moderately resistant or slow-mildewing. A single dominant gene that confers a high level of resistance has been identified in two lines. In addition, techniques for selecting for powdery mildew resistance in greenhouse trials and field nurseries are summarized.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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