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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Biology of the Genus Aphanomyces

Author
item Grunwald, Niklaus

Submitted to: International Aphanomyces Symposium
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 2003
Publication Date: October 1, 2003
Citation: GRUNWALD, N.J. THE BIOLOGY OF THE GENUS APHANOMYCES. INTERNATIONAL APHANOMYCES SYMPOSIUM. P 7-14. 2003.

Interpretive Summary: The water mold Aphanomyces is most closely related to organisms classified as stramenopiles to which golden-brown algae belong. Species of water molds in the genus Aphanomyces belong to an ecologically diverse group living as saprophytes or as parasites on fish, crayfish and plants. The genus Aphanomyces includes 45 species and formae speciales currently distinguished. Species in the genus Aphanomyces are described on single hosts (such as for example A. iridis on iris) or as having a broader host range (for example A. euteiches affecting several legume hosts).

Technical Abstract: The genus Aphanomyces, is among the smaller and less frequently encountered genera within the Saprolegniaceae. This group of organisms is most closely related to the golden brown algae and has been placed within the Stramenopiles. Within the family Saprolegniaceae, containing among others the genera Saprolegnia, Dictyuchus, and Achlya, the genus Aphanomyces constitutes an ancestral group. The genus Aphanomyces has an achlyoid spore dehiscence type which appears to be an ancestral character within the Saprolegniaceae. Species of water molds in the genus Aphanomyces belong to an ecologically diverse group living as saprophytes or as parasites on fish, crayfish and plants. Aphanomyces is a diploid, homothallic organism producing oospores and zoospores. The genus Aphanomyces includes 45 species and formae speciales currently distinguished. Species in the genus Aphanomyces are described on single hosts (such as for example A. iridis on iris) or as having a broader host range (for example A. euteiches affecting several legume hosts).

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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