Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Orchard Crops

Authors
item Shapiro Ilan, David
item Duncan, Larry - UNIV. OF FLORIDA
item Lacey, Lawrence
item Han, Richou - GUANGZHOU, CHINA

Submitted to: Nematodes as Biological Control Agents
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: February 10, 2004
Publication Date: December 7, 2005
Citation: Shapiro Ilan, D.I., Duncan, L.W., Lacey, L.A., Han, R. 2005. In Grewal, P., Ehlers, R-U, Shapiro-Ilan, D. (eds.) Orchard crops. Nematodes as Biological Control Agents. p. 215-230. CABI Publishing.

Interpretive Summary: Entomopathogenic nematodes are small round worms that are used as environmentally friendly bioinsecticides. This chapter reviews significant research on entomopathgenic nematode control of orchard pests indicating successes and failures, research needs, and potential for the future. Entomopathogenic nematodes are being applied commercially for control of some important insect pests of orchards such as citrus root weevils, and there are other insects for which commercial application may be within reach, e.g., codling moth in apples, western cherry fruit flies in cherries, navel orangeworm in almonds and pistacho, plum curculio in peaches, and pecan weevil in pecan. To improve and expand the use of entomopathogenic nematodes advances in research are required, particularly in reducing costs of production and application, and methodology to improve persistence of nematodes in soil or in the canopy.

Technical Abstract: This chapter reviews significant research on entomopathogenic nematode control of orchard pests indicating successes and failures, research needs, and potential for the future. Entomopathogenic nematodes are being applied commercially for control of some important insect pests of orchards (e.g., D. abbreviatus and Pachnaeus spp. in citrus) and there are a number of cases where commercial application may be within reach, e.g., C. pomonella in apples, R. indifferens in cherries, A. transitella in almonds and pistachio, C. caryae in pecans, C. nenuphar in apple and stone fruits, O. longicollis, and C. sordidus in banana, and A. dea and A. testudo in litchi. To improve and expand the use of entomopathogenic nematodes as inundative biocontrol agents for orchard pests advances in research are required, particularly in reducing costs of production and application, methodology to improve persistence of nematodes in soil or in the canopy. Additionally, inoculative conservation approaches to biocontrol with nematodes must be explored.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page