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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Molecular Phylogenetic Investigation of Invasive Tamarix in the U.S.A.

Authors
item Gaskin, John
item Schaal, Barbara - WASHINGTON UNIV-ST LOUIS

Submitted to: Systematic Botany
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 15, 2002
Publication Date: January 2, 2003
Citation: GASKIN, J.F., SCHAAL, B.A. MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETIC INVESTIGATION OF INVASIVE TAMARIX IN THE U.S.A. SYSTEMATIC BOTANY. SYSTEMATIC BOTANY. 2003. V. 28(1). P. 86-95.

Interpretive Summary: Tamarix is a taxonomically difficult Old World genus that has become naturalized and invasive in the Americas and Australia. We examine the morphology and taxonomic history of 12 putative U.S. invasive Tamarix species, and investigate current invasions using chloroplast and nuclear sequence data. We test molecular phylogenetic hypotheses regarding the relationships of putative invasive taxa, and conclude that there are four invasive entities in the U.S., two of which are T. aphylla and T. parviflora. The sequence data also identify an invasive entity consisting of genetically indistinguishable T. ramosissima and T. chinensis, and another consisting of genetically indistinguishable T. gallica and T. canariensis. There is evidence of introgression between T. ramosissima, T. canariensis, and T. gallica, which is a likely source of confusion in the identification of some Tamarix invasions.

Technical Abstract: Tamarix is a taxonomically difficult Old World genus that has become naturalized and invasive in the Americas and Australia. We examine the morphology and taxonomic history of 12 putative U.S. invasive Tamarix species, and investigate current invasions using chloroplast and nuclear sequence data. We test molecular phylogenetic hypotheses regarding the relationships of putative invasive taxa, and conclude that there are four invasive entities in the U.S., two of which are T. aphylla and T. parviflora. The sequence data also identify an invasive entity consisting of genetically indistinguishable T. ramosissima and T. chinensis, and another consisting of genetically indistinguishable T. gallica and T. canariensis. There is evidence of introgression between T. ramosissima, T. canariensis, and T. gallica, which is a likely source of confusion in the identification of some Tamarix invasions.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014