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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Differences in Feedlot Surface Moisture and Manure Content Control Odor Compound Production, Dust Potential, Greenhouse Gas Emission, and Nutrient Content

Authors
item Miller, Daniel
item Berry, Elaine
item Varel, Vincent

Submitted to: Soil Science Society of America Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 19, 2003
Publication Date: November 3, 2003
Citation: MILLER, D.N., BERRY, E.D., VAREL, V.H. DIFFERENCES IN FEEDLOT SURFACE MOISTURE AND MANURE CONTENT CONTROL ODOR COMPOUND PRODUCTION, DUST POTENTIAL, GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION, AND NUTRIENT CONTENT. CD-ROM. Denver, CO.: AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRONOMY, CROP SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA, AND SOIL SOCIETY OF AMERICA ANNUAL MEETING. 2003.

Technical Abstract: Cattle feedlot surface moisture and manure content vary spatiotemporally and are likely to be important factors controlling odor, dust, greenhouse gas, and NH3 emissions. This study examined the effect of six moistures (10% to 60%) and three manure/soil mixes (5%, 25%, and 75% manure) on odor compounds, greenhouse gases, dust potential, and nutrient losses over a two-week period. The primary greenhouse gas emitted from all but the driest soils was CO2, which was proportional to manure content. Trace gases (N2O and CH4) were also detected and comprised up to 98% of CO2-equivalents emitted. Added urea was rapidly converted to NH3, which was subsequently lost in all but the driest conditions. Odor compounds did not accumulate to high levels in any of the treatments. However, odor compound persistence differed; odor compounds were rapidly lost under aerobic conditions, but persisted longer under anaerobic conditions. Anaerobic conditions also enhanced the volatility of odorous VFA due to acid accumulation. Dust potential was highest under the driest conditions until a moisture threshold was attained. The moisture threshold increased with increasing manure content. We conclude that moisture had the greatest effect on greenhouse gases, nutrient losses, odor production, and dust potential, whereas manure content acted to modulate the effect of moisture.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014