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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Method to Identify Cotesia Flavipes and C. Sesamiae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

Authors
item Cole, T - KS STATE UNIVERSITY
item Ram, M
item Dowell, Floyd
item Omwega, C - CTR INSECT PHYS AND ECO
item Overholt, W - UNIV OF FLORIDA
item Ramaswamy, Sonny - KS STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Annals of the Entomological Society of America
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 4, 2003
Publication Date: November 1, 2003
Citation: Cole, T.J., Ram, M.S., Dowell, F.E., Omwega, C.O., Overholt, W.A., Ramaswamy, S.B. 2003. Near-infrared spectroscopic method to identify cotesia flavipes and c. sesamiae (hymenoptera: braconidae).. Annals of the Entomological Society of America. 2003. 96(6):865-869.

Interpretive Summary: Parasitoids are beneficial insects that can be used to control pest insects. Parasitoids of the Cotesia flavipes complex (C. flavipes and C. sesamiae) are natural enemies of stemboring lepidopteran pests in sub-Saharan Africa. The two species are difficult to differentiate using morphological markers, and a quick, reliable test was sought for their correct identification. Correct species identification is needed to monitor populations of beneficial insects, and to determine the efficacy of introduced species. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) could distinguish the cocoons of the two species with good accuracy. This technology would greatly expedite identification of field-caught insects used to determine ecological parameters and parasitization rates of an individual species.

Technical Abstract: Parasitoids of the Cotesia flavipes complex (C. flavipes and C. sesamiae) are natural enemies of stemboring lepidopteran pests in sub-Saharan Africa. The two species are difficult to differentiate using morphological markers, and a quick, reliable test was sought for their correct identification. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) could distinguish the cocoons of the two species with an accuracy of better than 85%. Calibrations were established using partial least squares analysis, enabling identification of cocoons of known species, cocoons from an alternative host, as well as in blind tests. This technology would greatly expedite identification of field-caught insects used to determine ecological parameters and parasitization rates of an individual species.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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