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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Cla-Enriched Diets Improve Health Benefits of Catfish Fillets

Authors
item Peterson, Brian
item Manning, B - MISS. STATE UNIV.
item Li, M - MISS. STATE UNIV.

Submitted to: Global Aquaculture Advocate
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 26, 2003
Publication Date: April 25, 2003
Citation: Peterson, B.C., Manning, B., Li, M. 2003. CLA-Enriched Diets Improve Health Benefits of Catfish Fillets. Global Aquaculture Advocate April p. 48-49.

Interpretive Summary: Conjugated linoleic acids have become the recent focus of fatty acid research because of their health benefits to humans. Research examined the effects of dietary CLA on production traits and fillet composition in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). CLA was supplemented at 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.0% of the diet. At the end of the study, fish were weighed, visceral fat removed, and fillets were analyzed for CLA. At three weeks, feed conversion ratio (FCR) was improved in fish fed diets containing 0.75 and 1.0% CLA, while weight gain was increased in fish fed diets containing 1.0% CLA. By week six, there were no differences in FCR or weight gain in fish fed CLA compared to control. The ratio of visceral fat to carcass weight was reduced while total fillet CLA was increased in fish fed dietary levels of CLA. Catfish fillets containing CLA could be a valuable dietary CLA source and be marketed as a specialized product with human health benefits.

Technical Abstract: Research was conducted to examine the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on production traits and fillet composition in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). CLA was supplemented into a soy-wheat-cottonseed meal diet at 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.0% of the diet. Fish were fed twice a day to apparent satiation for six weeks. At the end of the study, fish were weighed, visceral fat removed, and fillets were analyzed for CLA. At three weeks, feed conversion ratio (FCR) was improved in fish fed diets containing 0.75 and 1.0% CLA, while weight gain was increased in fish fed diets containing 1.0% CLA. By week six, there were no significant differences in FCR or weight gain in fish fed CLA compared to control. The ratio of visceral fat to carcass weight was reduced approximately 24% in fish fed diets containing 0.75% CLA. No significant difference was observed in carcass to body weight ratio (head removed and gutted to body weight ratio). Total fillet CLA was increased in fish fed dietary levels of CLA. Fillet CLA (% of total fat) was determined to be 3.7% and 6.7% in fish fed 0.5% and 1.0% dietary CLA compared to fish fed the control diet. Catfish fillets containing CLA could be a valuable dietary CLA source and be marketed as a specialized product with human health benefits.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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