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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Status of Research Activities at Snarc

Author
item STRAUS, DAVID

Submitted to: Investigational New Animal Drugs Meeting - Book of Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 15, 2003
Publication Date: July 30, 2003
Citation: STRAUS, D.L. STATUS OF RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AT SNARC. INVESTIGATIONAL NEW ANIMAL DRUGS MEETING - BOOK OF ABSTRACTS. 2003. v.9. p.1-5.

Technical Abstract: Epizootics of Ichthyophthiriasis can be controlled with potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and copper sulfate (CuSO4), but their effectiveness has not been confirmed in field studies. The purpose of these studies is to determine the concentrations of these compounds needed to control mortality associated with an Ichthyophthirius multifiliis infestation on channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus in a simulated pond environment. For KMnO4, the study requires an FDA-approved protocol and this has been through several iterations before being accepted. Several trials have been initiated, but refinements in the protocol were necessary and this has been addressed resulting in the successful outcome of the CuSO4 study. For the copper sulfate study, a temperature controlled room maintained the water temperature at 18 ± 1 °C. Juvenile channel catfish were exposed to I. multifiliis-infested fish until they developed immature trophonts. Twenty fish were then placed in each of 15 static fiberglass tanks containing 600 L of pond water and treated with CuSO4 every other day for 4 treatments; the study was maintained for 10 days post-treatment for a total of 17 days. Total alkalinity was 220 mg/L (as CaCO3) and treatment rates were 0.0, 1.1, 2.2, 3.3, and 4.4 mg/L CuSO4. The typical treatment rate for aquaculture ponds is 1 mg/L CuSO4 for every 100 mg/L total alkalinity, or 2.2 mg/L CuSO4 in the present study. The results indicate that CuSO4 is effective for controlling mortality associated with I. multifiliis epizootics at half the recommended treatment rate in our water. However, effective treatment in channel catfish ponds will also be influenced by other water chemistry and pond sediments.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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