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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Influences on Diet and Physical Activity among Middle-Class African American 8 to 10-Year-Old Girls at Risk of Becoming Obese.

Authors
item Thompson, Victoria - BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MED
item Baranowski, Thomas
item Cullen, Karen
item Baranowski, Janice
item Rittenberry, Latroy - BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MED
item Taylor, Wendell - UTH-SCHOOL OF PUB HEALTH
item Nicklas, Theresa

Submitted to: Journal of Nutrition Education
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 1, 2003
Publication Date: May 1, 2003
Citation: Thompson, V.J., Baranowski, T., Cullen, K., Baranowski, J., Rittenberry, L., Taylor, W.C., Nicklas, T. 2003. Influences on diet and physical activity among middle-class African American 8- to 10-year-old girls at risk of becoming obese. Journal of Nutrition Education. 35(3):115-123.

Interpretive Summary: This study was about finding ways to better understand diet, physical activity, and inactivity influences among preadolescent African American girls at risk of becoming obese. The research was done in greater Houston, TX area and it consisted of 8- to 10-year-old African American girls above the 50th percentile body mass index with a home computer, and their parent. Total number participating in the study was eighty two girls and seventy four parents. Discussions were audiotaped, manually recorded, transcribed, and coded. Parents and girls were concerned about overweight and viewed physical activity as a weight control practice. Mothers facilitated daughters' physical activity, while fathers and siblings were coparticipants. Girls had access to physical activity equipment and facilities. Snack food items and carbonated beverages were often limited by the parents, and water consumption was encouraged. Discrepancies were apparent between girls' and parents' responses. In conclusion, parental convenience and girls' food preferences influenced dietary intake. Obesity prevention programs should capitalize on parental motivation for their child's health and provide practical strategies to create healthful eating and physical activity.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this study was to understand diet, physical activity, and inactivity influences among preadolescent African American girls at risk of becoming obese. Interviews and group qualitative discussions (i.e., mixed qualitative research method) were conducted separately with 8- to 10-year-old African American girls and their parents. Setting: Greater Houston, Texas. Eight- to 10-year-old African American girls above the 50th percentile body mass index with a home computer (n = 82) and a parent (n = 74). Variables Measured: Influences on dietary practices and physical activity/inactivity among preadolescent African American girls. Discussions were audiotaped, manually recorded, transcribed, and coded. The primary coder analyzed the transcribed notes. The secondary coder reviewed and critiqued the initial coding. Parents and girls were concerned about overweight and viewed physical activity as a weight control practice. Mothers facilitated daughters' physical activity, while fathers and siblings were coparticipants. Girls had access to physical activity equipment and facilities. Snack food items and carbonated beverages were often limited by the parents, and water consumption was encouraged. Discrepancies were apparent between girls' and parents' responses. In conclusion, parental convenience and girls' food preferences influenced dietary intake. Obesity prevention programs should capitalize on parental motivation for their child's health and provide practical strategies to facilitate healthful eating and physical activity.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014