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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: EXPRESSED SEQUENCE TAGS AND NEW GENE CODING REGIONS FROM THE HORN FLY

Authors
item GUERRERO, FELIX
item Lysyk, Tim - LETHBRIDGE RES.-CANADA
item Kalischuk-Tymensen, Lisa - LETHBRIDGE RES.-CANADA

Submitted to: Southwestern Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 25, 2003
Publication Date: September 15, 2004
Citation: Guerrero, F., Lysyk, T.J., Kalischuk-Tymensen, L. 2004. Expressed sequence tags and new gene coding regions from the horn fly. Southwestern Entomologist. 29(3):193-208.

Interpretive Summary: We have sequenced a large set of previously unidentified gene coding regions from the horn fly. These genes are involved in the horn fly's metabolism, musculature, heat shock response, storage of energy for use in embryonic development, and regulation of gene expression. All of the gene sequence information has been deposited in Genbank, the National Center for Biotechnology Information's DNA sequence database. One coding region was selected for detailed study and it was found to be highly expressed only in early embryonic and pupal stages of the fly.

Technical Abstract: We have used the expressed sequence tag (EST) approach to isolate new gene coding regions from the horn fly, Haematobia irritans. Seventy three unique ESTs and one complete open reading frame were sequenced from genes that had not previously been identified in horn flies and recorded in the databases of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Fifteen ESTs are from genes involved in metabolism, 10 ESTs are from structural proteins, and 20 ESTs are from genes involved in other functions, including storage, heat shock response and transcription. Five of the ESTs have similarity to members of gene families which might be involved in resistance to pesticides. The entire coding region from a gene involved in cell cycle regulation was obtained and the mRNA encoding the protein found to be highly expressed in early embryonic and pupal stages of the fly.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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