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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: First Report of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus in Hosta in Florida

Authors
item Momol, M. Timur - UF
item Dankers, Hank - UF
item ADKINS, SCOTT

Submitted to: Plant Health Progress
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 29, 2003
Publication Date: October 24, 2003
Citation: Momol, M.T., Dankers, H., Adkins, S. 2003. First Report of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus in Hosta in Florida. Online. Plant Health Progress doi:, 10, 1094/PHP-2003-1024-01-HN.

Interpretive Summary: This is the first report of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infecting hosta in Florida. A description of symptoms and report of incidence are included. Diagnostic methods used to confirm the identity of tomato spotted wilt virus are also described. This thrips-vectored virus causes serious economic losses in many plant species in the United States and throughout the world. This report extends a collaborative vegetable virology research effort between ARS and University of Florida into ornamental virology. It also provides a timely account of TSWV infection of hosta to growers, Extension personnel and state and Federal regulatory and research scientists.

Technical Abstract: In spring 2003, symptoms similar to thrips-vectored spotted wilt disease caused by tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) were observed on hosta in Florida. Symptoms observed included leaf necrosis and stunting, chlorotic and necrotic spotting and distinctive ring patterns. The incidence of symptomatic hosta was less than 1% in the affected area. Using light microscopy, Tospovirus cytoplasmic inclusions were observed in all assayed symptomatic leaves. Diagnosis of TSWV from symptomatic leaves of hosta was confirmed by double-antibody sandwich-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with virus-specific primers from total RNA amplified a fragment of the nucleocapsid protein gene from symptomatic hosta plants, whereas no product was amplified from non-symptomatic hosta plants, thus confirming the diagnosis. This is the first report of TSWV on hosta in Florida. TSWV continues to be an economically important disease constraint to the production of ornamental plants, vegetables and field crops in the southeastern US and the known host range is expanding to include additional ornamental plant species in Florida.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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