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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Differential Infestation of Currant Borer in Ribes Cultivars

Authors
item Hummer, Kim
item Sabitov, Andrey - FAR EAST EXP. STATION

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: June 24, 2003
Publication Date: June 24, 2003
Citation: HUMMER, K.E., SABITOV, A. DIFFERENTIAL INFESTATION OF CURRANT BORER IN RIBES CULTIVARS. HORTSCIENCE. 2003. v.38(5): Abstract p. 662.

Interpretive Summary: The currant borer clearwing moth is a pest of black, red, and white currants throughout the world. While broad spectrum insecticides are the standard control, more environmentally friendly techniques, such as pheromones for mating disruption, are also successful. Genetic resistance is not reported or used to control this pest. We observed the natural infestation of the currant borer on 150 black, red and white currants at the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Clonal Germplasm Repository-Corvallis. We counted the number of larvae in about 75 stems of each type. Most larvae were found in 2-yr or older shoots. In highly infested black currant cultivars, such as 'Ojebyn', 'Lissil', and 'Tough Champion', 2 or 3 larvae were observed within one cane. Some red currant species were resistant to cane borers. Some black currant cultivars from Northern Sweden, Czech Republic, and England had low counts. The amount of borers in the same type of cultivars in different rows within the field were similar. Genetic resistance could be a good way to help control cane borers without using additional chemical pesticides. Breeders could incorporate cane borer resistance into breeding schemes.

Technical Abstract: The currant borer (Synanthedon tipuliformis Clerck), a clearwing moth, is a pest of black, red, and white currants (Ribes L.) throughout the world. While broad spectrum insecticides are the standard control, more environmentally friendly techniques, such as mating disruption using synthetic pheromones, are also successful. Genetic resistance is not extensively reported or employed as a pest control strategy. We screened 150 diverse black (Ribes subgenus: Ribes section: Botrycarpum), red and white currants (Ribes subgenus: Ribes section: Ribes) at the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Clonal Germplasm Repository-Corvallis, for natural infestation by currant borer. Fifty dormant canes (about 20 cm) of 1-yr and 2-yr wood, and about 15 of 3-yr or greater wood, were collected from each cultivar. Canes were cut transversely every 0.5 cm, and dissected longitudinally when needed. The average number of larvae per cane was calculated. Most larvae were found in 2-yr or older shoots. In highly infested black currant cultivars, such as R. nigrum L. 'Ojebyn', 'Lissil', and 'Tough Champion', 2 or 3 larvae were observed within one cane. Judging from the cultivar pedigrees, we suspect that a European red currant species, R. multiflorum Kit. ex Schult., contributes cane borer resistance. 'Detvan', 'Mulka', 'Redstart', 'Rolan', 'Rosetta', 'Rondom', and 'Rovada', had low larval counts, although a few hybrid R. multiflorum cultivars, such as 'Blanka', were highly infested. The R. nigrum 'Black Naples' derivatives, 'Saunders' and 'Kerry', had low borer counts, although 'Neosypaushayasya' was highly infested. Some black currant cultivars from Northern Sweden, Czech Republic, and England had low counts. Infestation levels of cultivar checks from different rows within the field were similar. Additional study will examine cane borer counts of wild Ribes species. Genetic resistance, or non-preference, of cane borer, could provide an additional tool for an integrated cane borer management control strategy for currant growers. Breeders could incorporate cane borer resistance into breeding schemes.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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