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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Potential Crops of the Future

Author
item Cermak, Steven

Submitted to: Dynamic Cropping Systems: Principles, Processes and Challenges
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 4, 2003
Publication Date: August 14, 2003
Citation: CERMAK, S.C. POTENTIAL CROPS OF THE FUTURE. DYNAMIC CROPPING SYSTEMS: PRINCIPLES, PROCESSES AND CHALLENGES. 165-173. 2003.

Interpretive Summary: Today, researchers, farmers, marketers, and industry partners must decide which new crops have the most potential to meet future challenges in a reasonable time. If it's the need for bio-based fluids from a new vegetable oil or the need for a third rotation crop in the Midwest, we must be ready for any agricultural challenge. Like most new industries, or "new crop" developers, there is the demand to have an active supply chain in place. With this demand, the people involved in the process become the most important factor for the success of a new crop. The individuals at each stage must be or must become experts in their link of the supply chain and have the capability and willingness to communicate. In order for a new crop to be a success, the people supporting this crop must be champions

Technical Abstract: Potential crops of the future will come from "new crops" being developed today. The term "new crops" is a widely used term. The following categories are used to define "new crops" (which are in no order of importance): (1) gathering new crops from the wild; (2) cultivating an undomesticated plant not previously grown; (3) genetically modifying a plant; (4) breeding cultivars of domesticated plants; (5) growing crops in new areas; (6) growing crops for new uses; (7) growing crops with new management techniques; (8) selling crops in new markets.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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