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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Transcript Profile Response of Select Citrus Defensive Genes to Insect Damage

Authors
item Shatters, Robert
item McKenzie, Cindy
item Hunter, Wayne
item Sinisterra, Xiomara - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
item Bausher, Michael

Submitted to: American Society of Plant Biologists Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 13, 2003
Publication Date: July 4, 2003
Citation: Shatters, R.G., Mckenzie, C.L., Hunter, W.B., Sinisterra, X., Bausher, M.G. 2003. Transcript profile response of select citrus defensive genes to insect damage. American Society of Plant Biologists Annual Meeting.

Technical Abstract: Plants are exposed to multiple types of insect feeding damage that include chewing, and sucking insects. Research was conducted to begin to understand the defensive mechanisms that are invoked during insect feeding. A citrus genomics EST database containing greater than 35,000 sequences was mined for potential defensive genes, and high-density arrays were used to screen 384 ESTs for changes in their transcript profile in response to feeding on leaves. Five classes of genes including metallothioneins, a GDSL-lipase/hydrolase, a pectin acetylesterase, a harpin-induced homolog, a cell-wall-associated putative defensive peptide, and a carbonate dehydrate were identified as genes encoding transcripts that increased in response to chewing insect damage. Mechanical damage induced similar responses in these transcripts; however, developmental status of the leaf had an important modulating effect on transcript response to damage. Transcript accumulation in response to either mechanical or chewing damage did not occur for any of the studied PR-proteins (proteins associated with pathogen defense) that included: chitinases, b-1,3-glucanases, or thaumatin-like proteinase inhibitors. Comparative analysis of phloem feeding insects to leaf chewing insects will be presented. Results are discussed in relationship to the possible role of each gene product in protection of the plant tissue.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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