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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Population Growth of Rhopalosiphum Padi (Homoptera: Aphididae) on Conventional and Transgenic Wheat

Authors
item Hesler, Louis
item Li, Z - SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV
item Cheesbrough, T - SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV
item Riedell, Walter

Submitted to: Journal of Entomological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 9, 2004
Publication Date: April 1, 2005
Citation: Hesler, L.S., Li, Z., Cheesbrough, T.M., Riedell, W.E. 2005. Population growth of rhopalosiphum padi (homoptera: aphididae) on conventional and transgenic wheat. Journal of Entomological Science. 40:186-196.

Interpretive Summary: Limiting infestations of cereal aphids is a key to preventing yield loss in wheat crops. Host-plant resistance, whether derived from conventional breeding methods or potentially through application of biotechnology, is one strategy for managing cereal aphids in wheat. The objective of our study was to evaluate population growth of the bird cherry-oat aphid (BCOA) on conventional, non-transgenic wheat varieties and on transgenic wheat lines capable of expressing a defense known as potato proteinase inhibitor II. In a set of assays with conventional varieties, Sharp, Marshall and Ember were relatively resistant to population growth of BCOA when compared to 2375 and Russ. In a second set of assays with conventional varieties, Sharp and Marshall were relatively resistant to BCOA-population growth when compared to the varieties Butte 86, Guard, Ivan and Prospect. In a third set of assays that included transgenic wheat, BCOA population growth on isolines derived from the transformation procedure was equal to or greater than that on non-transformed Prospect wheat. In two of those assays, low numbers of winged BCOA were found on isolines subjected to the transformation procedure but not on the non-transgenic control line. In summary, three contemporary wheat cultivars are currently available with resistance to R. padi, but a better understanding of expression of proteinase inhibitors in transgenic wheat is needed before these lines can be of practical use against BCOA.

Technical Abstract: Limiting infestations of cereal aphids is a key to preventing yield loss in wheat, Triticum aestivum L. Host-plant resistance, derived from conventional breeding methods or potentially through application of biotechnology, is one strategy for managing cereal aphids in wheat. The objective of our study was to evaluate population growth of the bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi L., on conventional, non-transgenic wheat varieties and on transgenic wheat lines capable of expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II. In a set of assays with conventional varieties, `Sharp,' `Marshall' and `Ember' were relatively resistant to population growth of R. padi compared to `2375' and `Russ.' A second set of assays with conventional varieties showed that Sharp and Marshall limited R. padi-population growth compared to the varieties `Butte 86,' `Guard,' `Ivan' and `Prospect.' In a third set of assays that included transgenic isolines of Prospect wheat, population growth of R. padi on isolines subjected to the transformation procedure was equal to or greater than that on non-transformed Prospect wheat. In two of those assays, low numbers of alatoid R. padi were found on isolines that had been subjected to the transformation procedure but not on non-transgenic Prospect wheat. In summary, three contemporary wheat cultivars are currently available with resistance to R. padi, but a better understanding of expression of proteinase inhibitors in transgenic wheat is needed before these lines can be of use against R. padi.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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