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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Non-Targeted Insects Captured in Fruit Fly Surveillance Traps

Author
item Thomas, Donald

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 15, 2003
Publication Date: September 15, 2003
Citation: Thomas, D.B. 2003. Non-targeted insects captured in fruit fly surveillance traps. Journal of Economic Entomology. 96:1732-1737.

Interpretive Summary: Traps baited with synthetic lures captured as many Mexican fruit flies as the traditional yeast bait, but with far fewer (20%) non-target insects. Ninety percent of the non-target insects were flies. Consequently, neither trap is efficacious against other citrus pests, which are mainly sucking bugs or caterpillars. Although the non-target catch is sometimes referred to as "trash", many non-target insects are beneficials including predators and parasites (especially tachina flies). The traps with synthetic lures killed fewer of these beneficials by a ratio of 4:1, compared to the yeast-baited traps. Certain insects, notably the lacewings and sweat bees, exhibited a somewhat greater preference (10 and 50%, respectively) for the synthetic lures. Overall, with regard to the deployment of the newer baits, the threat to predators, parasites and pollinators was found to be negligible, and certainly much less than that posed by the traditional traps.

Technical Abstract: Traps baited with synthetic lures (ammonium acetate and putrescine) captured as many Mexican fruit flies as the traditional torula yeast/borax slurry, but with far fewer (ratio 5:1) non-target insects. Ninety percent of the non-target insects were dipterans. Consequently, neither trap is efficacious against other citrus pests, which are mainly Hemiptera or Lepidoptera. Although the non-target catch is sometimes referred to as "trash", many non-target insects are beneficials, including predators and parasites (especially tachinids). The traps with synthetic lures killed fewer of these beneficials by a ratio of 4:1 compared to the yeast-baited traps. Certain taxa, notably the chrysopids and halictid bees, exhibited a somewhat greater preference (10 and 50%, respectively) for the synthetic lures. Overall, with regard to the deployment of the newer baits, the threat to predators, parasites and pollinators was found to be negligible, and certainly much less than that posed by the traditional traps

Last Modified: 8/29/2014