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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genetic Approaches to Understanding Orbivirus Infection in the Invertebrate Vector

Authors
item Campbell, Corey
item Wilson, William

Submitted to: American Society for Virology Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 7, 2003
Publication Date: July 14, 2003
Citation: Campbell, Corey, Wilson, William C. 2003. Genetic approaches to understanding orbivirus. American Society for Virology Meeting. July 12-16, 2003, University of California, Davis.

Interpretive Summary: Our goal is characterize the molecular mechanisms of virus/vector interactions in the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis, a vector of several arboviral diseases, including those transmitted by orbiviruses. Using genetic approaches we identified several genes that may be involve in the ability of a vector to transmit disease. We are also establishing a genetic database that will aid our understanding of vector biology and the genetic factors that may constitute barriers or enhancers of arbovirus infection.

Technical Abstract: Our goal is characterize the molecular mechanisms of virus/vector interactions in the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis, a vector of several arboviral diseases, including those transmitted by orbiviruses. Using subtractive libraries and reverse Northern blot analysis, we have identified 50+ cDNAs that appear to be more highly expressed in midge midguts or heads at various times during an orbivirus (EHDV) infection. These cDNAs include translation initiation factors, eIF3, eIF3 subunit 8 and eIF5A; ribosomal protein subunits, RPS6 and RPL32; and a double stranded RNA inducible gene, CsRED1. In addition, two putative cell surface signal transduction receptors, CsLAR and CsFZ2, involved in cell differentiation, were also identified. Tissue specific cDNA libraries have generated over 700 EST sequences. When considered together, this information will aid our understanding of vector biology and the genetic factors that may constitute barriers or enhancers of arbovirus infection.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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