Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Area-Wide Pest Management of Fruit Flies in Hawaiian Fruits and Vegetables

Authors
item VARGAS, ROGER
item JANG, ERIC
item Klungness, Lester

Submitted to: Proceedings of the Research Institute of the Subtropics Meeting on Fruit Flies
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2003
Publication Date: March 30, 2003
Citation: Vargas, R.I., Jang, E.B., Klungness, L.M. 2003. Area-wide pest management of fruit flies in hawaiian fruits and vegetables. Proceedings of the Research Institute of the Subtropics Meeting on Fruit Flies. p. 37-46.

Interpretive Summary: The goal of the Fruit Fly Areawide Pest Management (AWPM) program is to develop and integrate biologically based pest management approaches that will result in area-wide suppression and control of fruit flies throughout selected agricultural areas of Hawaii. The AWPM program will integrate two or more technologies into a comprehensive package that is economically viable, environmentally acceptable and sustainable. The program will result in a reduction in the use of organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, and further growth and development of diversified agriculture in Hawaii. Progress to date includes identification of three geographical areas on three islands for program implementation based on population monitoring, agricultural and geographical assessments throughout the state for areas most likely to benefit from application of the area-wide approach. In cooperation with the University of Hawaii, State Department of Agriculture, growers and other organizations, we have secured special local needs registrations for agricultural chemicals, implemented a fruit fly IPM extension educational program, developed site specific implementation plans and have initiated trapping, sanitation and control measures within a defined grid area for sites on Hawaii Island and Maui Island. A third site is presently being developed on Oahu Island.

Technical Abstract: Four economically important fruit flies have been accidentally introduced into Hawaii: melon fly, Mediterranean fruit fly, oriental fruit fly, and Malaysian fruit fly. Over 400 different host fruits are attacked. These fruit flies inhibit development of a diversified tropical fruit and vegetable industry, require that commercial fruits undergo quarantine treatment prior to export, and in Hawaii provide a breeding reservoir for their introduction into the continental United States. These exotic pests pose a serious threat of establishment into new areas with movement of people and commodities throughout the U.S. and the world. For example, if the Mediterranean fruit fly became established in California, projected losses would exceed $1 billion per year due to trade embargoes, loss of jobs, increased pesticide use, and direct crop loss. Present fruit fly control measures in Hawaii rely heavily on the application of organophosphate and carbamate insecticides to crops. Overuse of these insecticides has been implicated with secondary pest outbreaks, negative effects on beneficial insects, environmental contamination and adverse effects on human health. In 1999 a 5 year Area-wide Pest Management (AWPM) program was funded (FY2000) for management of fruit flies. The goal of the Fruit Fly AWPM program is to develop and integrate biologically based pest management approaches that will result in area-wide suppression and control of fruit flies throughout selected agricultural areas of Hawaii. The IPM program will integrate two or more technologies into a comprehensive package that is economically viable, environmentally acceptable and sustainable. The program will result in a reduction in the use of organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, and further growth and development of diversified agriculture in Hawaii. The technologies include: 1) field sanitation, 2) protein bait sprays and/or traps, 3) male annihilation with male lures and attractants, 4) augmentative parasitoid releases and 5) sterile insect releases. Program implementation will require ARS, state, university and community partnerships with the support of other research, regulatory and government agencies. Progress to date includes identification of three geographical areas on three islands for program implementation based on population monitoring, agricultural and geographical assessments throughout the state for areas most likely to benefit from application of the area-wide approach. In cooperation with the University of Hawaii, State Department of Agriculture, growers and other organizations, we have secured special local needs registrations for agricultural chemicals, implemented a fruit fly IPM extension educational program, developed site specific implementation plans and initiated trapping, sanitation and control measures within a defined grid area for sites on Hawaii Island and Maui Island. A third site is presently being developed on Oahu Island. Future plans for FY 03 include expansion of area-wide implementation activities in each of the identified areas, expansion to include suppression of new fruit fly species, continued research to address problems which inhibit implementation of the IPM program, and expansion into other agricultural areas not part of the existing area-wide program.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page