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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: First Record of Rice-Root Nematode (Meloidogyne Graminicola) in Florida

Authors
item Handoo, Zafar
item Klassen, Waldemar - UNIV FL, HOMESTEAD
item Abdul Baki, Aref
item Bryan, H - UNIV FL, HOMESTEAD
item Wang, Q - UNIV FL, HOMESTEAD

Submitted to: Society of Nematologists Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2003
Publication Date: September 1, 2003
Citation: Handoo, Z.A., Klassen, W., Abdul Baki, A.A., Bryan, H.H., Wang, Q. 2003. First record of rice-root nematode (meloidogyne graminicola) in florida [abstract]. J. Nematol. 35: 342.

Technical Abstract: A root-knot nematode was discovered on roots and soil of a prominent weed, sandbur (Cenchrus spp.), collected from a farm adjacent to Tamiami Airport, South Miami, Florida and was identified as Meloidogyne graminicola Golden and Birchfield, based on morphological observations. This is the first report of Meloidogyne graminicola from Florida and a new host record for this species. It is a major pest of rice in several countries. The infested farm, dominated by Cenchrus spp., was sampled as a pre-planting measure for plant-parasitic nematodes, and Meloidogyne juveniles were recovered. During the past 14 years this farm was continuously planted with tomato and sorghum sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor x S. bicolor var. sudanense (Piper) Stapf) in rotation. The field has heavy infestations of sandbur (Cenchrus spp.) and purple and yellow nutsedge, Cyprus rotundus L., and Cyprus esculentus L., respectively. The roots from the field did not exhibit any symptoms of galls typical of root-knot nematodes. However, heavily infected roots were dark brown to black-colored, and from each infected root area we recovered clusters of 5-10 root-knot nematode females with egg masses attached. This species' close relationship with two other closely related species, M. hapla, and M. naasi, are discussed. Additional information regarding distribution of this nematode within the region is needed, especially in rice fields throughout Florida.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
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