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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Soil-Borne Oospores of Phytophthora Infestans in Central Mexico Survive Intercropping Periods and Infect Potato Plants in the Field

Authors
item Fernandez-Pavia, S - UNIV DE MICHOACAN
item Grunwald, Niklaus
item Diaz-Valasis, M - INIFAP, MEXICO
item Cadena-Hinojosa, M - INIFAP, MEXICO
item Fry, W - CORNELL UNIV

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 14, 2003
Publication Date: November 1, 2003
Citation: FERNANDEZ-PAVIA, S.P., GRUNWALD, N.J., DIAZ-VALASIS, M., CADENA-HINOJOSA, M., FRY, W.E. SOIL-BORNE OOSPORES OF PHYTOPHTHORA INFESTANS IN CENTRAL MEXICO SURVIVE INTERCROPPING PERIODS AND INFECT POTATO PLANTS IN THE FIELD. PLANT DISEASE. 88:29-33. 2003.

Interpretive Summary: The potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans produces sexual reproductive structures called oospores. At this point it is not clear how important oospores are in initiating epidemics and as a means of survival of the pathogen. Oospores a double walled resting structures and it would be expected that they can survive winter periods. Survival and infectivity of these oospores in soils naturally infested with oospores were studied in central Mexico where these pathogen originated from. Oospore concentration, viability and infectivity varied among soils collected during the intercropping period in different locations of central Mexico. In some soils, oospores were infective regardless of the time at which they were collected during the intercropping period. However, oospore viability and infectivity decreased following two years of intercropping. The number of stem lesions and initial disease severity were significantly higher in soils with moderate oospore infestation compared to soils with low infestation. Our study confirms that oospores can survive intercropping periods and serve as a source of primary inoculum in the central highlands of Mexico.

Technical Abstract: Survival and infectivity of oospores in soils naturally infested with P. infestans oospores were studied in central Mexico. Sporangia were selectively eliminated from soil samples to determine infectivity attributable to the presence of oospores. Selective elimination of sporangia was achieved by two cycles of drying and wetting the soil. Oospore concentration, viability and infectivity varied among soils collected during the intercropping period in different locations of central Mexico. In some soils, oospores were infective regardless of the time at which they were collected during the intercropping period. However, oospore viability and infectivity decreased following two years of intercropping. The number of stem lesions and initial disease severity were significantly higher in soils with moderate oospore infestation compared to soils with low infestation. Our study confirms that oospores can survive intercropping periods and serve as a source of primary inoculum in the central highlands of Mexico.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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