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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Occurrence of Seed Coat Mottling in Soybean Plants Inoculated with Bean Pod Mottle Virus and Soybean Mosaic Virus

Authors
item Hobbs, H - CROPSCI UOFI URBANA
item Hartman, Glen
item Wang, Y - CROPSCI UOFI URBANA
item Hill, C - CROPSCI UOFI URBANA
item Bernard, R - CROPSCI UOFI URBANA
item Pedersen, W - CROPSCI UOFI URBANA
item Domier, Leslie

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 3, 2003
Publication Date: November 11, 2004
Citation: Hobbs, H.A., Hartman, G.L., Wang, Y., Hill, C.B., Bernard, R.L.,Pedersen, W.L.,Domier, L.L. 2004. Occurrence of seed coat mottling in soybean plants inoculated with bean pod mottle virus and Soybean mosaic virus. Plant Disease. 87:1333-1336.

Interpretive Summary: Incidences of soybean seed coat mottling have increased in recent years in the Midwestern US. Soybean seed coat mottling has often been a problematic symptom to soybean growers and the soybean industry. The objective was to determine if the infection of soybean plants by BPMV, SMV, alone or in combination would affect seed coat mottling in eight soybean entries. The percentages of seeds in eight soybean lines with seed coat mottling were evaluated at harvest after inoculating plants during the growing season with Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV), Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), and both viruses inside an insect-proof cage in the field. Plants infected with BPMV and SMV, alone or in combination, produced seed coat mottling, whereas noninoculated plants produced little or no mottled seed. The SMV resistance gene Rsv1 in Williams isoline L78-379 and the resistance gene(s) in the small-seeded line L97-946 gave high levels of protection against mottling caused by SMV. These studies showed that both viruses cause seed mottling, and SMV resistance is one way to reduce the mottling. This information is important to soybean seed producers, and others in the soybean industry having problems with seed coat mottling.

Technical Abstract: Soybean seed coat mottling has often been a problematic symptom to soybean growers and the soybean industry. The percentages of seeds in eight soybean lines with seed coat mottling were evaluated at harvest after inoculating plants during the growing season with Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV), Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), and both viruses inside an insect-proof cage in the field. Results from experiments conducted over two years indicated that plants infected with BPMV and SMV, alone or in combination, produced seed coat mottling, whereas noninoculated plants produced little or no mottled seed. BPMV and SMV inoculated on the same plants did not always result in higher percentage of mottled seeds compared to BPMV or SMV alone. There was significant virus, line, and virus x line interaction for seed coat mottling. The non-seed coat-mottling gene (Im) in Williams isoline L77-5632 provided limited, if any, protection against mottling caused by SMV and none against BPMV. The Peanut mottle virus (PMV) resistance gene Rpv1 in Williams isoline L85-2308 did not give any protection against mottling caused by SMV, whereas the SMV resistance gene Rsv1 in Williams isoline L78-379 and the resistance gene(s) in the small-seeded line L97-946 gave high levels of protection against mottling caused by SMV. The correlations ® = 0.77 for year 2000, r = 0.89 for year 2001 between virus infection of the parent plant and seed coat mottling were significant (P = 0.01), indicating that virus infection of plants caused seed coat mottling.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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