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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Molecular genotyping of sugarcane clones with microsatellite DNA markers

Authors
item Pan, Yong-Bao
item Cordeiro, Giovanni - SO CROSS UNIV, AUSTRALIA
item Richard Jr, Edward
item Henry, Robert - SO CROSS UNIV, AUSTRALIA

Submitted to: Maydica
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 30, 2003
Publication Date: December 30, 2003
Citation: Pan, Y.-B., Cordeiro, G.M., Richard Jr, E.P., Henry, R.J. 2003. Molecular genotyping of sugarcane clones with microsatellite DNA markers. Maydica. 48:319-329.

Interpretive Summary: Sugarcane breeders attempt to expand the genetic background of sugarcane varieties by introducing desirable traits from related wild species. However, the efficiency of such transfer has been low due to the technical difficulties in crossing between sugarcane and wild species and in selection of true hybrids from these crosses. Twenty-seven sugarcane varieties were fingerprinted with nine microsatellite DNA markers. A total of 52 DNA fragments were produced in these varieties. Presence or absence of these DNA fragments in a particular variety constituted its genetic fingerprint. The genetic relatedness among these 27 varieties was assessed based on their genetic fingerprints. With the exception of varieties L 97-137 and Q124, eight groups of varieties were identified that shared at least 80% similarity in their DNA fingerprints. Availability of these DNA fingerprints should help sugarcane breeders select true hybrids, estimate genetic relatedness between varieties, and protect their ownership in relation to varieties they develop.

Technical Abstract: Genetic variability among 27 sugarcane clones was analyzed with nine sugarcane microsatellites. A total of 52 alleles were identified using a capillary electrophoresis system with 41 alleles displaying varying degrees of polymorphism and the remaining 11 monomorphism. There were eight alleles for sugarcane microsatellite SMC286CS, five for SMC334BS, eight for SMC336BS, four for SMC713BS, five for mSSCIR5, five for mSSCIR33, five for MCSA042E08, four for MCSA053C10, and eight for MCSA068G08. Presence or absence of these 52 alleles from a clone constituted a microsatellite fingerprint for that clone and allowed the assignment of an arbitrary genotype and assessment of genetic diversity among the clones. With the exception of two clones L 97-137 and Q124, eight groups of clones were identified that shared at least 80% homology in their fingerprints. The derivation of molecular fingerprints such as these should allow sugarcane geneticists and breeders to estimate genetic relatedness between clones, determine their genetic lineage, and protect their ownership in relation to varieties they develop. The microsatellite fingerprints can also aid in the selection of true hybrids and determination of allele transmission.

Last Modified: 12/26/2014
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