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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Alternatives to Methyl Bromide for Calla Lily Production.

Authors
item Gerik, James
item Vail, Susan
item Elmore, C - UC DAVIS
item Greene, I - GOLDEN STATE BULB GROWERS

Submitted to: Phytopathology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 6, 2003
Publication Date: June 1, 2003
Citation: GERIK, J.S., VAIL, S.S., ELMORE, C.L., GREENE, I.D. ALTERNATIVES TO METHYL BROMIDE FOR CALLA LILY PRODUCTION.. PHYTOPATHOLOGY. 2003.

Technical Abstract: Alternatives to methyl bromide for calla lily production. J.S. GERIK (1), S.S. Vail (1), C.L. Elmore (2), and I.D. Greene (3). (1) USDA-ARS, Parlier, CA 93648; (2) U.C. Davis, Davis, CA 95616; (3) Golden State Bulb Growers, Moss Landing, CA 95039. A trial was established in Marina, CA to test alternatives to methyl bromide for calla lily production. The pest targets were weeds and soilborne pathogens. Chemicals were applied through the drip irrigation tape in either 33mm or 67mm of water. Prior to treatment, sachets containing rhizomes of calla lily, nutsedge, and seed of mustard and malva were buried in each plot. Chemical treatments included chloropicrin, furfural + metham sodium, sodium azide, iodomethane + chloropicrin, 1,3-dichloropropene and 1,3-dichloropropene + chloropicrin and a water control. No treatments controlled malva. Most of the treatments significantly controlled the nutsedge, mustard, calla rhizomes, and existing weeds. Populations of Pythium sp. Phytophthora sp. and Fusarium oxysporum were significantly reduced by most treatments. Most treatments improved stand count 45 days after sowing. These data indicate that some treatments are efficacious for controlling weeds and disease pathogens in a severely infested calla field. It appears the amount of water used to apply the fumigants may be important.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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