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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A Review of Area Spread and Summary of Recent Studies

Authors
item Lager, Kelly
item Brockmeier, Susan

Submitted to: Proceedings of Allen D Leman Swine Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 1, 2002
Publication Date: September 14, 2002
Citation: LAGER, K.M., BROCKMEIER, S. A REVIEW OF AREA SPREAD AND SUMMARY OF RECENT STUDIES. PROCEEDINGS OF ALLEN D LEMAN SWINE CONFERENCE. 2002. p. 68-70.

Technical Abstract: Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a viral disease of swine caused by the PRRS virus. This disease was first recognized in the late 1980s and since then it has become the number one infectious disease concern of the swine industry. The PRRS virus will cause reproductive failure (infertility, abortions, stillborn and weak-born pigs) in sows, a moderate to severe respiratory disease in young pigs, and a mild respiratory disease in boars. Most transmission of PRRS virus is due to the movement of infected animals and the use of PRRS virus-contaminated semen collected from infected boars. In general, these routes of direct virus transmission can be controlled by the use of strict biosecurity practices, i.e., the limitation of the movement of animals, people, and equipment into a herd and the use of semen from PRRS virus-negative boar studs. However, each year there are numerous cases where a swine herd becomes infected with PRRS virus despite the implementation of strict biosecurity plans designed to prevent just such an occurrence. In these situations it is assumed that the virus entered the herd through some indirect route. This paper summarized research that investigated various routes of PRRS virus transmission. These studies were completed at the National Animal Disease Center and at other institutions that have investigated various routes of PRRS virus transmission. These potential routes of indirect virus transmission include aerosol (virus moving with the wind); biting insects (flies and mosquitoes); virus-contaminated boots, coveralls, needles, etc.; and birds. The concern of pork producers and the direction of future research is how to guard against these potential routes of virus transmission.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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