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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Induction of Respiration by Wounding Is Temperature Dependent in Sugarbeet (Beta Vulgaris L.) Root.

Authors
item Fugate, Karen
item Finger, Fernando - UNIV FEDERAL DE VICOSA
item Anderson, Marc - NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV

Submitted to: American Society of Plant Biologists Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 21, 2003
Publication Date: June 20, 2003
Citation: KLOTZ, K.L., FINGER, F.F., ANDERSON, M.D. INDUCTION OF RESPIRATION BY WOUNDING IS TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT IN SUGARBEET (BETA VULGARIS L.) ROOT. AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PLANT BIOLOGISTS ANNUAL MEETING. 2003. p. 81. Abstract No. 283.

Technical Abstract: The respiration rate of harvested plant products is largely influenced by temperature and wounding. In sugarbeet root, respiration rate is positively associated with storage temperature and the extent of wounding during the harvest and delivery of roots. An investigation into the underlying physiology of this phenomenon revealed that the wound induced increase in respiratory tissue activity was temperature dependent. Respiration was measured as O2 consumption at 25 degrees C in tissue sections taken 1 cm below the root epidermis. Wounded roots incubated at 10 degrees C exhibited increased respiration over unwounded roots throughout the thirteen days of incubation, with maximum respiration occurring two days after wounding. Wounding had no influence on respiratory activity at 1 degree C. Determination of the capacities of cytochrome c oxidase and alternative oxidase respiratory pathways using isolated mitochondria and respiratory pathway specific inhibitors revealed a three to four-fold increase in cytochrome c oxidase capacity and a two to five-fold increase in alternative oxidase capacity at both 1 degree and 10 degrees C. The data suggest that the lack of a respiratory wound response at 1 degree was not due to a general reduction in metabolic activity or limiting mitochondrial respiratory capacity at the lower temperature. Similarly, an increase in phosphofructokinase activity in wounded roots was observed at 10 degree, but not at 1 degree C.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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